Nation Briefs

Yahoo ousts CEO, names replacement

NEW YORK – Yahoo swept out Scott Thompson as CEO Sunday in an effort to clean up a mess created by an exaggeration about his education that destroyed his credibility as he set out to turnaround the long-troubled Internet company.

Ross Levinsohn, who oversees Yahoo’s content and advertising services, is taking over as interim CEO. He becomes the fourth person to run Yahoo in eight months.

Yahoo hired Thompson, the former head of eBay’s PayPal, in January to orchestrate a reversal. Though Yahoo is one of the Internet’s most-visited websites, the company has struggled to grow in face of competition from the likes of Google and Facebook. The company’s difficulties have irked investors. Thompson took the helm as Yahoo’s fourth chief executive in less than five years.

Thompson’s abrupt exit after just four months on the job came as part of the latest shake-up on Yahoo’s board of directors, which has been in a state of flux for several months.

Legendary bass player ‘Duck’ Dunn dies

NEW YORK – Donald “Duck” Dunn, the bassist who helped create the gritty Memphis soul sound at Stax Records in the 1960s as part of the legendary group Booker T. and the MGs and contributed to such classics as “In the Midnight Hour,” “Hold On, I’m Coming” and “Sitting on the Dock of the Bay,” died Sunday at 70.

Dunn, whose legacy as one of the most respected session musicians in the business also included work with John Belushi and Dan Aykroyd’s Blues Brothers as well as with Levon Helm, Eric Clapton, Neil Young and Bob Dylan, died while on tour in Tokyo.

News of his death was posted on the Facebook site of his friend and fellow musician Steve Cropper, who was on the same tour. Cropper said Dunn died in his sleep.

Dunn was born in Memphis, Tenn., in 1941, and according to the biography on his official website, was nicknamed for the cartoon character by his father. His father, a candy maker, did not want him to be a musician.

Crews fight growing Arizona forest fire

PAYSON, Ariz. – Hot-shot crews, air tankers and helicopters on Sunday were battling a fire in Arizona’s Tonto National Forest that had grown to nearly 4 square miles, while two other fires kept crews busy in other areas over the weekend.

The Sunflower Fire was first spotted Saturday morning. By Sunday, it had charred about 2,500 acres.

Tonto National Forest spokesman David Albo said the fire about 20 miles south of Payson was moving in a northeasterly direction.

Smoke was visible from Phoenix on Sunday, but no structures were threatened.

Associated Press