Obama to Colorado audience: No more ‘tax-cut fairy dust’

GOP: 8 % jobless rate isn’t good enough

President Barack Obama addresses a crowd of about 3,500 at the State Fairgrounds in Pueblo on Thursday. Obama laid out the case for his re-election, saying he has the better plan to improve the economy for middle-class Americans. Enlarge photo

Joe Hanel/Durango Herald

President Barack Obama addresses a crowd of about 3,500 at the State Fairgrounds in Pueblo on Thursday. Obama laid out the case for his re-election, saying he has the better plan to improve the economy for middle-class Americans.

PUEBLO – President Barack Obama closed out his two-day visit to Colorado on Thursday with appeals to college students, Latinos and women – all crucial parts of his constituency.

Republican Mitt Romney’s campaign trailed Obama every step of the way, dispatching members of the party’s A-list to counter the president’s speeches.

During his visit, Obama sat for an interview with Durango Herald editorial writer Megan Graham, along with a Denver Post columnist. On Thursday, he granted interviews to the La Junta Tribune Democrat, Lamar Ledger and Huerfano Journal.

In Pueblo on Thursday, Obama shifted his tone back to middle-class economic concerns after highlighting women’s rights and health care a day earlier in Denver.

His administration has provided an average tax cut of $3,600 per middle-class family, Obama said. He restated his call to raise taxes on income above $250,000.

He said Republicans have no plan other than to cut bank regulations and taxes for the rich.

“They have tried to sell us this trickle-down, tax-cut fairy dust before. It didn’t work,” he said.

Romney’s allies are stoking talk about the decline of America for political gain, Obama said.

“There isn’t a country on Earth that wouldn’t trade places with the United States of America,” he said.

On Wednesday, Romney dispatched one of his possible vice-presidential picks, Ohio Sen. Rob Portman, to carry the campaign’s message in Colorado. On Thursday, it was Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, who often is mentioned as a presidential candidate in four or eight years.

Jindal dismissed Obama’s criticisms in a brief interview at a campaign stop in Fountain.

“We’re Americans first, and certainly we want our country to be doing better economically,” Jindal said. “One of the reasons we’re working so hard in this election is we think America would be doing a lot better. Unemployment would be below 8 percent. We wouldn’t be borrowing a trillion dollars a year. We wouldn’t be heading the way of Greece if we had a different president in the White House.”

Obama stumped later Thursday at Colorado College in Colorado Springs. In Pueblo, he spoke to a crowd of 3,500 at the State Fairgrounds. He was introduced by two of the state’s most successful Latino politicians, Interior Secretary Ken Salazar and former Cabinet secretary Federico Peña.

jhanel@durangoherald.com

Jindal Enlarge photo

Jindal

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