Family Briefs

Federal judge rules against Hawaii gay marriage

HONOLULU – A federal judge ruled against two Hawaii women who want to get married instead of enter into a civil union, handing a victory to opponents of gay marriage in a state that’s been at the forefront of the issue.

U.S. District Court Judge Alan C. Kay’s ruling sides with Hawaii Health Director Loretta Fuddy and Hawaii Family Forum, a Christian group that was allowed to intervene in the case.

“Accordingly, Hawaii’s marriage laws are not unconstitutional,” the ruling states. “Nationwide, citizens are engaged in a robust debate over this divisive social issue. If the traditional institution of marriage is to be reconstructed, as sought by the plaintiffs, it should be done by a democratically elected legislature or the people through a constitutional amendment,” and not through the courts.

The lawsuit by Natasha Jackson and Janin Kleid argues they need to be married in order to get certain federal benefits. Co-plaintiff Gary Bradley wants to marry his foreign national partner to help him change his immigration status. Their attorney, John D’Amato, said they will appeal.

“The ruling affirms that protecting and strengthening marriage as the union of one man and one woman is legitimate, reasonable and good for society,” said Dale Schowengerdt, an attorney representing Hawaii Family Forum.

Anti-bullying campaign targets parents in new ads

WASHINGTON – Parents are urged to teach their children to speak up if they witness school bullying in new ads that target an issue that top Obama administration officials vow to make a national priority.

A long-term campaign featuring television, print and Web ads was unveiled Monday and will start running in October. The campaign is a joint effort by the Ad Council, a nonprofit that distributes public service announcements, and the Free to Be Foundation, a group that includes entertainers Marlo Thomas, Alan Alda and Mel Brooks.

Online and print ads will warn parents that their children regularly encounter negative messages such as “you’re worthless” and “everybody hates you.”

The ads were unveiled Monday at an annual anti-bullying summit hosted by the Department of Education in Washington.

Associated Press