Romney: Send the incumbent ‘outside’

Obama defends record on foreign policy

Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney campaigns at D’Evelyn High School in Denver on Sunday. Enlarge photo

Charles dharapak/Associated Press

Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney campaigns at D’Evelyn High School in Denver on Sunday.

DENVER – Mitt Romney says he’s the man who can finally change Washington.

Romney made his first Colorado appearance since early August on Sunday night at a school on the border of Denver and Jefferson County.

He says Barack Obama has admitted he can’t change Washington from the inside, and that it can only be changed from the outside. Romney urged the crowd to give the president the chance to be outside Washington again after Nov. 6.

Romney appeared before an enthusiastic crowd after a rough two weeks during which he was criticized for his comments on violence in the Middle East and a secret recording in which he appeared to dismiss capturing the votes of the 47 percent of people who don’t pay income taxes.

He is scheduled to be in Pueblo this morning.

Also Sunday, President Barack Obama, defended his foreign policy record at a time of anti-American rage in the Muslim world. He fired back at suggestions from Republican Mitt Romney that the president has been weak with allies and enemies alike.

In an interview airing the night before, Obama met with other world leaders at the United Nations. The president said, “If Gov. Romney is suggesting that we should start another war, he should say so.”

It was Obama’s most direct rebuttal yet to persistent skepticism by his White House rival on his handling of an unraveling situation in the Middle East. Romney has charged the U.S. stance has been marred by miscalculations, mixed messages and appeasement.

The foreign-policy arguments come as both candidates sharpen their strategy just six weeks ahead of Election Day. Speaking to reporters on a flight to Colorado Sunday night, Romney acknowledged he was slipping behind Obama in several swing states and said he would spend more time with voters in the coming weeks.

“I think the fundraising season is probably a little quieter going forward,” he said following a weekend largely devoted to raising money in California.

Facing Republican fears that his campaign is moving in the wrong direction, Romney huddled earlier in the day with his top advisers, preparing for next month’s debates and crafting a more aggressive strategy.

“I don’t pay a lot of attention to the day-to-day polls. They change a great deal,” Romney said. “And I know that in the coming six weeks they’re very unlikely to stay where they are today.”

Obama is launching a new campaign offensive today with his first television advertisement targeting Romney’s comments about Americans who don’t pay income taxes. The ad, which was to start running in swing state Ohio, argues that Romney should stop attacking others on taxes and “come clean” on his own.

The ad uses Romney’s comments to wealthy donors that 47 percent of Americans don’t pay income taxes, believe they are victims and feel entitled to government assistance. It shows Romney saying, “My job is not to worry about those people.”

The 30-second spot signals that Obama will keep making the wealthy Romney’s taxes a campaign issue even after the Republican released a second year of information about his personal finances on Friday.

Romney and Obama both discussed foreign policy in interviews broadcast Sunday on CBS’ “60 Minutes.”

Romney, who has criticized Obama’s response to unrest in Syria and anti-American protests across the Muslim world, broadened his reproach to include Israel. He said Obama’s failure to schedule a meeting with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu during the annual U.N. gathering this week “sends a message throughout the Middle East that somehow we distance ourselves from our friends.”

The White House has said scheduling precluded a meeting between the two leaders, who won’t be in New York at the same time. But Obama pushed back on the notion that he feels pressure from Netanyahu, dismissing as noise the Israeli leader’s calls for the U.S. to lay out a “red line” that Iran’s nuclear program mustn’t cross to avoid American military intervention.

“When it comes to our national security decisions, any pressure that I feel is simply to do what’s right for the American people,” Obama said. “And I am going to block out any noise that’s out there.”

In a wide-ranging interview conducted the day after U.S. Ambassador to Libya Chris Stevens was killed in an attack on Benghazi, Obama defended his foreign policy successes, noting he’d followed through on a commitment to end the war in Iraq and had nabbed al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden.

He also waxed optimistic that winning a second term would give him a mandate to overcome obstructionism from congressional Republicans whose No. 1 goal, he said, has been to prevent his re-election.

“My expectation is, my hope is that that’s no longer their number one priority,” Obama said. “I’m hoping that after the smoke clears and the election season’s over that that spirit of cooperation comes more to the fore.”

Romney, in an interview conducted last week, sought to deflect attention from his running mate, Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan, over their differences in Medicare policy: “I’m the guy running for president, not him.”

While reaffirming his commitment to lowering all income tax rates by 20 percent, Romney expressed no unease about his refusal to offer specifics, such as which loopholes and deductions he’d eliminate to pay for the cuts.

“The devil’s in the details. The angel is in the policy, which is creating more jobs,” Romney said, adding that he doesn’t want to see overall government revenue reduced.