Winter, spring collide in Southwest Colo.

4 inches expected in town, 8 inches at higher elevations

A passenger on the Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad contemplates the light snow showers Friday in Durango as the train departs for its run to Cascade Canyon and back. Heaviest snow accumulations from the storm are expected today. Enlarge photo

SHAUN STANLEY/Durango Herald

A passenger on the Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad contemplates the light snow showers Friday in Durango as the train departs for its run to Cascade Canyon and back. Heaviest snow accumulations from the storm are expected today.

Thoughts of spring reverted to winter Friday in Southwest Colorado after a widespread Pacific storm brought cold air and snow.

“March is a fickle month, because you are in a transition between winter and spring,” said Jim Daniels, meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Grand Junction.

The brunt of the storm was expected to hit early this morning in Durango.

Forecasters were calling for up to 4 inches in town, 8 inches at higher elevations, and between 10 and 20 inches on south-facing slopes in the San Juan Mountains.

The storm covered a wide swath of the southwestern United States. The heaviest snowfall was expected along the Mogollon Rim in Arizona, the Wasatch Range that runs from central Utah to the Idaho border and over the San Juan Mountains.

The high temperature was expected to be 36 degrees today and Sunday in Durango.

The storm is expected to blow out of the region tonight, making way for warmer temperatures beginning Monday with highs in the 40s.

As winter gives way to spring, the atmosphere warms up which allows it to carry more moisture, Daniels said. That can result in good snowfall for the mountains, which cling to cold air, he said.

“March is typically one of the better months for snow accumulation in the San Juans because it is able to tap that moist Pacific air,” he said.

shane@durangoherald.com

Winter, spring collide in Southwest Colo.

4 inches expected in town, 8 inches at higher elevations

A passenger on the Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad contemplates the light snow showers Friday in Durango as the train departs for its run to Cascade Canyon and back. Heaviest snow accumulations from the storm are expected today. Enlarge photo

SHAUN STANLEY/Durango Herald

A passenger on the Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad contemplates the light snow showers Friday in Durango as the train departs for its run to Cascade Canyon and back. Heaviest snow accumulations from the storm are expected today.

Thoughts of spring reverted to winter Friday in Southwest Colorado after a widespread Pacific storm brought cold air and snow.

“March is a fickle month, because you are in a transition between winter and spring,” said Jim Daniels, meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Grand Junction.

The brunt of the storm was expected to hit early this morning in Durango.

Forecasters were calling for up to 4 inches in town, 8 inches at higher elevations, and between 10 and 20 inches on south-facing slopes in the San Juan Mountains.

The storm covered a wide swath of the southwestern United States. The heaviest snowfall was expected along the Mogollon Rim in Arizona, the Wasatch Range that runs from central Utah to the Idaho border and over the San Juan Mountains.

The high temperature was expected to be 36 degrees today and Sunday in Durango.

The storm is expected to blow out of the region tonight, making way for warmer temperatures beginning Monday with highs in the 40s.

As winter gives way to spring, the atmosphere warms up which allows it to carry more moisture, Daniels said. That can result in good snowfall for the mountains, which cling to cold air, he said.

“March is typically one of the better months for snow accumulation in the San Juans because it is able to tap that moist Pacific air,” he said.

shane@durangoherald.com