Try a (mostly) traditional glazed ham

Twenty-four servings may seem like a lot, but Easter ham is like Thanksgiving turkey – you want ample leftovers. So we went big to ensure you’ll have plenty to send home with guests, and still have more for sandwiches and soups the next few days. Enlarge photo

Matthew Mead/Associated Press

Twenty-four servings may seem like a lot, but Easter ham is like Thanksgiving turkey – you want ample leftovers. So we went big to ensure you’ll have plenty to send home with guests, and still have more for sandwiches and soups the next few days.

Who says the traditional Easter ham has to be traditional?

We understand that there is good reason for many traditions, particularly when it comes to food. After all, many food traditions earned their place because they are simply delicious. The glazed ham is a fine example. And that’s why we decided not to mess with that part of this spring staple.

We did, however, play around with what our ham is glazed with. We decided to ditch the orange marmalade, brown sugar, pineapple-cherry and various clove-spiked glazing options. Instead, we took our inspiration from an Asian pantry staple – hoisin sauce. It comes ready-made by the jar, usually in the Asian food section of the grocer.

From there, we stirred in a few extras to jazz it up, then used it as a simple glaze. In keeping with the theme, we served the ham with a light slaw made from Napa cabbage and snow peas dressed with a light vinaigrette. While our ham was on the large size, if you don’t need one quite so big, you can always use any extra glaze as a sauce alongside the ham.

EDITOR’S NOTE: Alison Ladman is a recipe developer for the AP. Follow her on Twitter at https://twitter.com/CrustAndCrumbCo