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Legislative Roundup: Bill to push back last call dies

Hold ‘sanctuary’ cities accountable legislation advances
A bill that would have allowed local jurisdictions to extend last call and that was threatened by a govenor veto was killed Monday in the state Legislature.

DENVER – The end of the legislative session is creeping up and with it comes a unique way of killing pieces of legislation that are unlikely to survive the two chambers and the Governor’s veto pen: Lay them over until the day after the session ends.

Three bills got the treatment Monday, including House Bill 1123, which would allow local governments to extend the hours during which bars and restaurants could serve alcohol in their jurisdictions.

The bill has drawn attention because Gov. John Hickenlooper sent a letter to legislative leadership hinting he would veto it unless data showing that pushing back last call could contribute to public safety.

In addition to the bills that unceremoniously died Monday, 25 were scheduled for third reading, 20 for second reading and 18 went before committees.

Floor work

Senate Bill 281, which would hold lawmakers responsible for crimes committed by undocumented immigrants in their jurisdictions if it was deemed a “sanctuary” jurisdiction, was adopted by the Senate on second reading.

In addition to removing immunity from civil liability for lawmakers for policies that do not comply with federal immigration law, SB 281 would strip state funding from local governments who were found wanting.

A similar bill to SB 281, HB 1134, was killed by the Democratic “kill committee” in the House earlier this session, so the Senate Bill is essentially dead upon arrival if it should pass third reading and cross to the House.

HB 1260, which would place limits on campaign contributions for county level elections, was passed on third reading by the House on a 37-27 party line vote, with Republicans in opposition.The bill was part of a package of four bills aimed at reforming campaign finance law introduced by Democrats earlier this session. So far all but one of these bills has failed to gather Republican support.

HB 1260 heads to the Senate and unless it can pick up Republican support, is unlikely to make it into law.

HB 1176, which would allow school districts to hire retired employees on a short term basis, was adopted by the Senate on second reading.The bill aims to bring some level of relief to rural school districts that are having difficulty finding qualified applicants for teaching and support positions. It will receive third reading and final vote in the coming days.

HB 1279, which would reform law on construction defects litigation by increasing the requirements to pursue a lawsuit, was passed unanimously by the House and heads to the Senate. The bill represents a beacon of bipartisan work on the priorities identified by leadership prior to the session, and is expected to move through the Senate swiftly.

Committee work

HB 1279, which would reform law on construction defects litigation by increasing the requirements to pursue a lawsuit, was passed unanimously by the House and heads to the Senate. The bill represents a beacon of bipartisan work on the priorities identified by leadership prior to the session, and is expected to move through the Senate swiftly.HB 1273, which would have required developers to list water conservation efforts that could be pursued on new projects of 50 or more units to receive a building permit, was killed by the Senate State, Veterans and Military Affairs Committee on a 3-2 party line vote, with Republicans opposing.

lperkins@durangoherald.com

HB 1279, which would reform law on construction defects litigation by increasing the requirements to pursue a lawsuit, was passed unanimously by the House and heads to the Senate. The bill represents a beacon of bipartisan work on the priorities identified by leadership prior to the session, and is expected to move through the Senate swiftly.HB 1273, which would have required developers to list water conservation efforts that could be pursued on new projects of 50 or more units to receive a building permit, was killed by the Senate State, Veterans and Military Affairs Committee on a 3-2 party line vote, with Republicans opposing.

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