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LATEST CORONAVIRUS CASES
As of 4 p.m. Friday, May 7

In Colorado

  • 520,816 cases (up 1,402 from yesterday)
  • 28,502 hospitalized (up 49 from yesterday)
  • 2,946,579 people tested (up 5,310 from yesterday)
  • 6,508 deaths from COVID (up 8 from yesterday)
  • 5,112 Outbreaks at residential and non-hospital health care facilities (up 24 from yesterday)

In the region

  • La Plata County: 3,902 cases (up 14 from yesterday), 39 deaths among cases
  • La Plata County vaccinations: 25,535 (45.4% of population) full vaccinations; 29,201 (51.9% of population) at least one dose
  • Montezuma County: 1,866 cases (up 7 since Wednesday), 14 deaths from COVID and 7 deaths with COVID
  • Archuleta County: 930 (up 2 from yesterday), 1 death among cases
  • Dolores County: 80 cases (up 0 from yesterday)
  • San Juan County (CO): 45 cases
  • San Juan County (NM): 14,750 cases (up 20 from yesterday), 469 deaths
  • San Miguel County: 875 cases

Videos & Photos

Fort Lewis Lacrosse Fort Lewis College women's lacrosse take on CSU-Pueblo on Friday at FLC. 950 592 Autumn Rymerson with Fort Lewis College moves the ball against Colorado State University Pueblo on Friday at FLC. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1300 1382 Abby Escandon with Fort Lewis College makes a driving shot for a goal on Friday while playing Colorado State University Pueblo at FLC. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1300 825 Jojo Lutz with Fort Lewis College plays defense against Colorado State University Pueblo on Friday at FLC. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1600 1061 Ellie Martinez with Fort Lewis College moves the ball up the field on Friday while playing Colorado State University Pueblo at FLC. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 973 Ann Nelson with Fort Lewis College moves passes the ball on Friday while playing Colorado State University Pueblo at FLC. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1300 1228 Avery Joslin with Fort Lewis College moves the ball up the field while playing Colorado State University Pueblo on Friday at FLC. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1300 859 Rebecca Kiyokawa with Fort Lewis College plays defense against Colorado State University Pueblo on Friday at FLC. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1147 Halley Dostie, top, and Maren Clark with Fort Lewis College knock the ball loose from a Colorado State University Pueblo player on Friday at FLC. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1300 928 Head coach Ashley Travis of Fort Lewis College women’s Lacrosse cheers her team on while playing Colorado State University Pueblo on Friday at FLC. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1265 886 Fort Lewis College women’s Lacrosse celebrate a goal while playing Colorado State University Pueblo on Friday at FLC. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1171 Averi Basso goalie for Fort Lewis College defends the goal on Friday while playing Colorado State University Pueblo at FLC. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true
Fort Lewis College women's lacrosse take on CSU-Pueblo on Friday at FLC.
Strater Hotel sold The Strater Hotel, owned for decades by Rod Barker and his family, sold the hotel this week to Ross Garrett, who lives in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. 1600 1067 Rod Barker, owner of the Strater Hotel, talks about the history of the hotel. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald false 1600 1085 Rod Barker, owner of the Strater Hotel, talks about the history of the hotel. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald false 1225 656 Durango Herald file false 1542 1028 The Diamond Belle Saloon is often busy with patrons eating, drinking and listening to ragtime piano. Photo by The Durango Herald false 2274 1591 Durango Herald file false 1940 1487 The Colorado Mounted Rangers and others march past the Strater Hotel during the 21st annual Durango Cowboy Poetry Gathering parade on Oct. 3, 2009, in downtown Durango. Photo by The Durango Herald false 1542 1034 Durango Herald file false 1150 1648 A young Rod Barker, owner of the Strater Hotel, stands inside his historic business in this undated photograph. Durango Herald file false 1318 2322 Riders head south toward the Strater Hotel on Main Avenue during the USA Pro Cycling Challenge in August 2012 in Durango. Durango Herald file false 1600 1067 Rod Barker, owner of the Strater Hotel, stands in the Luis L’ Amour Room in 2011. Over the last half century, the Barker family has accumulated a huge collection of American Victorian furniture for the Strater Hotel. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald false 1600 1062 Cassi Romine with the Diamond Belle Saloon in the Strater Hotel, lets Tom and Karen Shupe with their daughter Shelby Shupe, all from Austin, know that the saloon is family friendly in 2018 during their stop in Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald false 1600 1153 Rod Barker, owner of the Strater Hotel, talks about some of the history of the hotel during the Annual Strater Open House in April 2015 at the hotel. At right are Wayne and Gayle Bedor. Durango Herald file false 1600 963 A crowd gathers around as employees of the Strater Hotel enact a shootout in front of the hotel on Main Avenue in 2016. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald false 1930 1287 Rod Barker, owner of the Strater Hotel, talks with Penny Spittler, left, a.k.a. Sadie Six-Shooter, and Leslie Ashcraft, a.k.a. Fanny Anny, while the two were in town in 2014 for the 7th Annual Durango Heritage Celebration. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald false
The Strater Hotel, owned for decades by Rod Barker and his family, sold the hotel this week to Ross Garrett, who lives in the Dallas-Fort Worth area.
Rail car restoration The Galloping Goose Historical Society in Dolores works on restoring five rail cars that ran on area rialroad tracks. 1600 1088 Galloping Goose Historical Society members from left, Chris Pranskatis, Ben Deason, Joe Becker and Bill Wolf work on Friday taking a door off of a stock railcar that was built in 1903 to transport livestock. The historical society is in the process of stabilizing the car and four other types of of narrow-gauge railcars to put on display in Dolores. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1577 1010 A railcar that the Galloping Goose Historical Society is fixing up in Dolores. The historical society is in the process of stabilizing five cars that ran on the local narrow-gauge. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1274 943 Galloping Goose Historical Society member, Chris Pranskatis, works on taking off a door on Friday of a stock railcar in Dolores that was built in 1903 to transport livestock. The historical society is in the process of stabilizing the car and four other types of of narrow-gauge railcars to put on display in Dolores. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1600 1069 A railcar that the Galloping Goose Historical Society is fixing up in Dolores. The historical society is in the process of stabilizing five cars that ran on the local narrow-gauge. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 600 725 A railcar that the Galloping Goose Historical Society is fixing up in Dolores. The historical society is in the process of stabilizing five cars that ran on the local narrow-gauge. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1300 1486 A railcar that the Galloping Goose Historical Society is fixing up in Dolores. The historical society is in the process of stabilizing five cars that ran on the local narrow-gauge. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1300 532 A railcar that the Galloping Goose Historical Society is fixing up in Dolores. The historical society is in the process of stabilizing five cars that ran on the local narrow-gauge. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1600 1067 Galloping Goose Historical Society members from left, Ben Deason, Bill Wolf Chris Pranskatis and Joe Becker work on Friday taking a door off of a stock railcar that was built in 1903 to transport livestock. The historical society is in the process of stabilizing the car and four other types of of narrow-gauge railcars to put on display in Dolores. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1406 A railcar that dumps its load from the bottom is a car that the Galloping Goose Historical Society is fixing up in Dolores. The historical society is in the process of stabilizing five cars that ran on the local narrow-gauge. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1545 980 A railcar that dumps its load from the bottom is a car that the Galloping Goose Historical Society is fixing up in Dolores. The historical society is in the process of stabilizing five cars that ran on the local narrow-gauge. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1300 1300 At some point someone carved the Tommy Boy Mine into a beam in a box car that the Galloping Goose Historical Society is fixing up in Dolores. The historical society is in the process of stabilizing five cars that ran on the local narrow-gauge. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1600 1126 A railcar that the Galloping Goose Historical Society is fixing up in Dolores. The historical society is in the process of stabilizing five cars that ran on the local narrow-gauge. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1278 At some point someone wrote their name in a box car that the Galloping Goose Historical Society is fixing up in Dolores. The historical society is in the process of stabilizing five cars that ran on the local narrow-gauge. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1600 1067 A railcar that the Galloping Goose Historical Society is fixing up in Dolores. The historical society is in the process of stabilizing five cars that ran on the local narrow-gauge. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1600 1064 Bill Wolf, with the Galloping Goose Historical Society, describes how wooden panels could slide down for air circulation on one of the box cars that the society is fixing up in Dolores. The historical society is in the process of stabilizing five cars that ran on local narrow-gauge tracks. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1300 1283 One of two box cars that the Galloping Goose Historical Society is fixing up in Dolores. The historical society is in the process of stabilizing five cars that ran on local narrow-gauge tracks. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true
The Galloping Goose Historical Society in Dolores works on restoring five rail cars that ran on area rialroad tracks.
Fort Lewis College women's soccer quarterfinal The Fort Lewis College women's soccer took on Westminster College in the RMAC quarterfinals on Tuesday at Dirks Field in Durango. 950 1194 Mckenna Ford of Fort Lewis College collides while going up for the ball during the RMAC quarter finals game against Westminster College on Tuesday at FLC. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1380 Katie Smith of Fort Lewis College passes the ball during the RMAC quarter finals game against Westminster College on Tuesday at FLC. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1294 Diana Sifuentes of Fort Lewis College collides midfield during the RMAC quarter finals game against Westminster College on Tuesday at FLC. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1139 Ashley Strader of Fort Lewis College headers the ball during the RMAC quarter finals game against Westminster College on Tuesday at FLC. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1435 Aubrey Swindle of Fort Lewis College passes the ball during the RMAC quarter finals game against Westminster College on Tuesday at FLC. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1274 Aubrey Swindle of Fort Lewis College moves the ball during the RMAC quarter finals game against Westminster College on Tuesday at FLC. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1237 Katie Smith of Fort Lewis College goes for the ball during the RMAC quarter finals game against Westminster College on Tuesday at FLC. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1277 Fort Lewis College goalie Katherine Dunbabin grabs the ball during the RMAC quarter finals game against Westminster College on Tuesday at FLC. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1320 Skylar Byrnes of Fort Lewis College goes low as she controls the ball during the RMAC quarter finals game against Westminster College on Tuesday at FLC. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1300 966 An emotional loss for Fort Lewis College players at the end of the RMAC quarter finals game against Westminster College on Tuesday at FLC. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1187 An emotional loss for Fort Lewis College goalie Katherine Dunbabin at the end of the RMAC quarter finals game against Westminster College on Tuesday at FLC. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true
The Fort Lewis College women's soccer took on Westminster College in the RMAC quarterfinals on Tuesday at Dirks Field in Durango.
Bayfield at Durango volleyball Non-league rivals Bayfield and Durango met on the volleyball court in a big showdown Wednesday night at DHS. 1300 825 Kyle Rowland of Durango High kills against Bayfield High School on Wednesday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1300 576 Durango High School takes to the floor during the introductions before the start of Wednesday’s night game against Bayfield High School at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1333 Sage Killough of Bayfield High sets the ball while playing Durango High School on Wednesday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1057 Melissa Roberts of Bayfield High School kills over Durango High School defenders on Wednesday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1341 Paige Ammerman of Durango High kills against Bayfield High School on Wednesday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1337 Kyle Rowland of Durango High kills against Bayfield High School on Wednesday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1108 Brooke Merchant of Bayfield High kills against Paige Ammerman of Durango High School on Wednesday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1289 Lainey Voss of Durango High kills against Bayfield High School on Wednesday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1300 1235 Leah Wolf of Durango High kills against Bayfield High School on Wednesday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1210 Emily Nelson of Bayfield High digs the ball while playing Durango High School on Wednesday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1195 Leah Wesley of Durango sets the ball while playing Bayfield High School on Wednesday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1170 Macee Schulz, left, and Brooke Merchant of Bayfield High block a Durango High School kill on Wednesday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1300 1330 Brooke Merchant of Bayfield High kills against Durango High School on Wednesday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 962 Durango High fans showed up for the Bayfield High School game on Wednesday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1250 Kyle Rowland of Durango sets the ball while playing Bayfield High School on Wednesday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1300 900 Durango celebrates a point while playing Bayfield High School on Wednesday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true
Non-league rivals Bayfield and Durango met on the volleyball court in a big showdown Wednesday night at DHS.
K-9 search and rescue Jon Bonnette works with his dogs, training them for search and rescue and human remains detection. 1600 1156 Isidore, an air-scent trained search and rescue dog, is all business in the field while trying to find three people who hid on a 40-acre plot Tuesday during a search and rescue training exercise near Flora Vista. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1300 1098 Jon Bonnette gets the attention of his dogs, Isidore, left, trained in air-scent search and rescue, and Raaz, trained in human remains detection, on Tuesday before a search and rescue training exercise near Flora Vista. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1353 Isidore, an air-scent trained search and rescue dog, is all business in the field while trying to find three people who hid on a 40-acre plot Tuesday during a search and rescue training exercise near Flora Vista. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1449 Not only has Jon Bonnette trained Isidore for search and rescue, but she demonstrates Tuesday some fun tricks he has taught her before a search and rescue training exercise near Flora Vista. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1600 1052 Jon Bonnette works with his dogs, Isidore, left, trained in air-scent search and rescue, and Raaz, trained in human remains detection, on Tuesday during a search and rescue training exercise near Flora Vista. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1258 Isidore, an air-scent trained search and rescue dog, returns to her owner after locating a person. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1300 909 Jon Bonnette plays fetch and tug-of-war with Isidore, his air-scent trained search and rescue dog, after a training exercise Tuesday near Flora Vista. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1600 1143 Isidore, an air-scent trained search and rescue dog, is all business in the field while trying to find three people who hid on a 40-acre plot Tuesday during a search and rescue training exercise near Flora Vista. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1300 1607 Isidore, an air-scent trained search and rescue dog, returns to her owner after locating a person. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1089 Jon Bonnette plays fetch and tug-of-war with Isidore, his air-scent trained search and rescue dog, after a training exercise Tuesday near Flora Vista. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true
Jon Bonnette works with his dogs, training them for search and rescue and human remains detection.
Durango High School volleyball beats No. 7 Montrose Durango High School volleyball takes on Montrose High School on Saturday at DHS. 950 1226 Nancy Fiero of Durango High School gets a kill on Saturday while playing Montrose High School at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1300 981 Paige Ammerman, left, and Nancy Fiero of Durango High School go up to block a Montrose High School kill on Saturday at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 899 1224 Paige Ammerman of Durango High School gets a kill on Saturday while playing Montrose High School at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1273 Paige Ammerman of Durango High School gets a kill on Saturday while playing Montrose High School at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 600 1447 Mason Rowland of Durango High School serves on Saturday while playing Montrose High School at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 600 927 Paige Ammerman of Durango High School sets the ball while playing Montrose High School on Saturday at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1184 Mason Rowland of Durango High School gets a kill on Saturday while playing Montrose High School at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 600 684 Kelley Rifilato, head coach of Durango High School volleyball, talks with her players as they play Montrose High School on Saturday at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 600 752 Lainey Voss of Durango High School digs the ball on Saturday while playing Montrose High School at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1305 Kyle Rowland of Durango High School digs the ball on Saturday while playing Montrose High School at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1300 652 Durango High School celebrates while playing Montrose High School on Saturday at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1300 813 Durango High School takes on Montrose High School on Saturday at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1339 Aava Dreger of Durango High School blocks a Montrose High School kill on Saturday at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1300 1357 Leah Wolf of Durango High School gets a kill on Saturday while playing Montrose High School at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 2500 1668 Kelley Rifilato, head coach of Durango High School volleyball, talks with her players as they play Montrose High School on Saturday at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true
Durango High School volleyball takes on Montrose High School on Saturday at DHS.
Bennet remembers Boulder victims on Senate floor In tearful address, senator shares anecdotes, demands gun control 2500 1392 In a speech at the Senate, U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet read the names and ages of the victims killed earlier this week in a shooting in Boulder. He said each of the 10 victims represent “the best of Colorado.” false U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet shared personal anecdotes and urged his colleagues to vote for better gun control legislation Wednesday on the Senate floor in the wake of Monday’s deadly shootings in Boulder. “My heart goes out to all the families, and the entire community of Boulder,” Bennet said. “We have endured too many tragedies as a state.” On Monday, less than a week after eight people, mostly of Asian descent, were shot and killed in Atlanta, 10 people were killed in a King Soopers grocery store in Boulder. The suspect has been charged and is in custody. “It’s long past time for Congress to take meaningful action to keep deadly weapons out of the wrong hands,” Bennet said in a news release issued Monday after the shooting. “There are steps that the overwhelming majority of Americans want us to take. And they have every right to expect us to finally do something about gun violence in our country. Enough is enough.” On Wednesday, he called for similar action. “We can’t allow this to become normal,” Bennet said on the Senate floor. Bennet spent 15 minutes talking about the Boulder shooting. In his speech, he shared information about the 10 victims, lamented how younger people, including his 21-year-old daughter, have grown up “in the shadow of gun violence” and urged his fellow senators to pass legislation to prevent future tragedies. “My daughter’s generation will always bear the burden of a national government that did nothing to protect them,” he said. Bennet, D-Colo., shared the names of the victims, their ages, their occupations and some personal anecdotes, quoting their family and friends in his speech as well as some of their own posts on the internet. He said each of the victims represent “the best of Colorado.” “I’m just asking us to show an ounce of their courage, by doing whatever we can to keep weapons of war out of our communities; to pass universal background checks; to limit the size of magazines; to address the epidemic crisis of mental health in this country,” Bennet said. “It seems like that would be the least that we could do.” The senator’s tone and presence was solemn during his speech, and he was visibly choked up at times. He frequently paused to wipe away tears. 0 Video YouTube 1280 720 “They have grown up with a reasonable fear that they will be shot in their classrooms, or in their schools, or at a movie theater, or in any public place,” Bennet said. “I didn’t grow up in an America with more gun-related deaths than virtually any country in this world. And we can’t accept it for their America.” He brought up the 1999 shooting at Columbine High School in Colorado, the 2017 shooting in Las Vegas and the 2012 shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut. He said the vote taken in the Senate after the Sandy Hook shooting was “one of the darkest moments” of his career, because “the Senate couldn’t even pass universal background checks.” “Who are we to insist that they live terrified in their own country? Nobody insisted that we live that way,” Bennet said. “But our failure to act has helped create these conditions. And we can’t wait any longer. The Senate needs to act. There’s nobody else to act but the United States Senate.” Earlier in this month, the U.S. House passed two bills that would increase background checks on people looking to purchase firearms in a partisan vote. Republicans, including U.S. Rep. Lauren Boebert, R-Colo., opposed the legislation. Boebert condemned the violence on Monday, but maintained her stance against gun control and said Democrats should “stop focusing on gun control and start focusing on border control,” in a tweet Thursday. The two gun-control bills have been received in the Senate, but have yet to be scheduled to be debated or voted on. Grace George is an intern for The Durango Herald and The Journal in Cortez and a student at American University in Washington, D.C.
In tearful address, senator shares anecdotes, demands gun control
New Bayfield gym teaches Native American fighting art Pine River Valley to be hub for guardian art 1600 1140 Wesley Burkhart, 8, climbs over obstacles before executing a series of kicks during class at Bayfield Nexus Guardian Art. Nexus Guardian Art teaches a fighting style rooted in Native American lacrosse games. false 950 917 Wesley Burkhart, 8, gets a high five from Great Owl Lightning after climbing over obstacles during class at Bayfield Nexus Guardian Art. Guardian art looks like a mixture of modern-day parkour, mixed martial arts, acrobatics, self-defense and wrestling. false 1600 1132 Wolf Kiva Lighting, of Southern Ute and Hopi heritage and an instructor at Nexus Guardian Art, plays the flute before the start of class to help students focus. false 1300 987 Students learn how take down each other during class at Bayfield Nexus Guardian Art. false 1600 949 Nexus Guardian Art in Bayfield aims to hold future training sessions and camps in the Pine River Valley. The events would attract students from around the nation. false 0 Video YouTube 1280 720 Flutes, kicks, spins and flips are common features of Bayfield’s newest gym, Nexus Guardian Art. To the regular bystander, Nexus lessons seem like a mixture of parkour, mixed martial arts and self-defense. But students are learning a Native American ancestral fighting art rooted in the original game of lacrosse – guardian art. And the Pine River Valley plays a leading role in Nexus’ plans to bring guardian art to the Four Corners. “I guess in modern English words ... it’s kind of like real life ninja training for kids and adults,” said Great Owl Lightning, co-founder of Nexus Guardian Art and a member of the Ojibwe Nation. 950 996 Great Owl Lightning, co-founder of Nexus Guardian Art, encourages students during class. The guardian art fighting style allows students to mix and match techniques, which builds independence and leadership, Lightning said. false Guardian art fighters have competed successfully against other disciplines, like Muay Thai and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. But Lightning was careful to distinguish between them: The guardian art philosophy does not focus on martial concepts, such as strike first, strike hard, no mercy, that can be found in other disciplines, he said. “A guardian is not trying to go to war with life. A guardian is trying to nurture life,” Lightning said. “It’s all about being a guardian for yourself, for your community, for your family. Part of our teaching is how to be a guardian to the Earth.” Nexus offers virtual and in-person training to kids, starting at age 3, and up to the adult level. A typical class features self-defense moves, climbing, acrobatics, striking, grappling and spirit running, which is comparable to modern-day parkour. “The cool thing about it is it’s really a diverse skill set that they’re teaching,” said Andrew Trujillo, whose three children train at Nexus. “That’s why I like it. The kids aren’t doing the same thing every time. It’s evolving as they learn, as they grow.” His kids are building their self-confidence, friendships, agility – and spending more time at home jumping around on the furniture, Trujillo said. 1600 1157 Jaxx Pena, 6, swings on a rope to then climbs over an obstacle during class at Bayfield Nexus Guardian Art. Classes are offered for children, starting at age 3. Classes are also offered to adults. false The program is open to everyone. It’s a way for people to share in Native American culture and North American ancestry, Lightning said. “If you’re going to practice like a Japanese art, you almost have to become Japanese in order to learn it,” he said. “We want people to honor their own ancestry. And that’s a big part of our teachings.” The guardian art movement and philosophy is based on Native American lacrosse, played across North and South America and even in coastal Asia from time immemorial, Lightning said. The game did not look anything like the lacrosse known today. Instead of a field, they played on a mountain. Teams would score points by hitting a ball on a totem pole at the top of the mountain. It was also a full-contact game. Players needed to be skilled in stick fighting, tackling, wrestling, spirit running, kicking and punching in order to reach the totem pole. “This is how communities used to settle disputes with each other. That’s why you won’t find a lot of communities having big battles and war in North America,” Lightning said. “They would call it ‘little brother of war.’” 1600 1079 Sylus Frane , 8, focuses before the start of class at Bayfield Nexus Guardian Art. Guardian art classes begin with a meditative practice and dreaming exercises that help students focus their attention. false Nexus Guardian Art began teaching 20 years ago, primarily in Canada or its headquarters in California. During the past eight years, the training school held programs with the Navajo and Hopi tribes. Starting in 2018, they held programs, featuring language immersion, with the Southern Ute Indian Tribe. Nexus considered opening a location in Ignacio, but progress froze when the COVID-19 pandemic began. It opened up with Bayfield Gymnastics and moved into its new location in January. Nexus opened doors to the public at the end of February, Lightning said. Nexus also purchased a property near Forest Lakes to host summer camps in the Four Corners, part of the organization’s nonprofit arm, called Guardian Saga. Guardian Saga holds camps and training programs that attract Indigenous, rural and underprivileged youths from across North America. “It’s about really investing out here. We think this place is just beautiful and magical,” Lightning said. smullane@durangoherald.com
Pine River Valley to be hub for guardian art
Inside DeNier A look inside the vacant Robert E. DeNier Youth Services Center in Bodo Industrial Park. 1600 591 The Robert E. DeNier Youth Services Center in Bodo Industrial Park. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1406 The gymnasium inside the Robert E. DeNier Youth Services Center in Bodo Industrial Park. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1600 1067 A holding cell at the Robert E. DeNier Youth Services Center in Bodo Industrial Park. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1600 1067 The command center at the Robert E. DeNier Youth Services Center in Bodo Industrial Park. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1600 1047 Frank van Scherpenseel, maintenance team leader with La Plata County, walks through one of two common areas with rooms around it at the Robert E. DeNier Youth Services Center in Bodo Industrial Park. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1554 1067 One of two fenced in areas at the Robert E. DeNier Youth Services Center in Bodo Industrial Park. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1300 867 Radios were left in a command center at the Robert E. DeNier Youth Services Center in Bodo Industrial Park. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1425 Dozens of keys hang in a command center for all the different rooms and areas in the Robert E. DeNier Youth Services Center in Bodo Industrial Park. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1600 1088 A leaky roof plagues the Robert E. DeNier Youth Services Center in Bodo Industrial Park. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 950 The medical room in the Robert E. DeNier Youth Services Center in Bodo Industrial Park. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1600 978 The Robert E. DeNier Youth Services Center in Bodo Industrial Park. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1376 A room where detainees would sleep and have their space at the Robert E. DeNier Youth Services Center in Bodo Industrial Park. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1425 Shoes that were left in the Robert E. DeNier Youth Services Center in Bodo Industrial Park. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1600 1067 The kitchen at the Robert E. DeNier Youth Services Center in Bodo Industrial Park. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1600 1067 Megan Graham, spokeswoman with La Plata County, and Frank van Scherpenseel, maintenance team leader with La Plata County, look over the cafeteria on Tuesday in the Robert E. DeNier Youth Services Center in Bodo Park. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1500 1023 The serving window from the kitchen to the cafeteria at the Robert E. DeNier Youth Services Center in Bodo Industrial Park. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1300 867 Rite of Passage operated the Robert E. DeNier Youth Services Center for years before its contract was suspended in summer 2018. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1600 1052 The education room at the Robert E. DeNier Youth Services Center in Bodo Industrial Park. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1300 722 The are dozens of heavy steel and wooden doors in the Robert E. DeNier Youth Services Center in Bodo Industrial Park. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 633 The education room with a wire in the glass between the hallway and the room at the Robert E. DeNier Youth Services Center in Bodo Park. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1600 1067 A common area surrounded with rooms at the Robert E. DeNier Youth Services Center in Bodo Industrial Park. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1300 899 Books in the library at the Robert E. DeNier Youth Services Center in Bodo Park. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1600 1067 A room where detainees would sleep and have their space at the Robert E. DeNier Youth Services Center in Bodo Industrial Park. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1600 1095 Frank van Scherpenseel, maintenance team leader with La Plata County, walks through the library at the Robert E. DeNier Youth Services Center in Bodo Industrial Park. true 1600 996 The gymnasium at the Robert E. DeNier Youth Services Center in Bodo Industrial Park. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true
A look inside the vacant Robert E. DeNier Youth Services Center in Bodo Industrial Park.