Log In


Reset Password

Videos & Photos

Durango school board candidate gives sermon mentioning ‘separation of church and state,’ or lack thereofRichard ‘Dean’ Hill also says children come with owner’s manual: The Bible231153Richard "Dean" Hill is a candidate for Durango School District 9-R’s Board of Education. In an August church sermon, he made comments about the separation of church and state that gained attention on social media.(Courtesy of Dean Hill)Should specific theologies shape public school policy? Richard “Dean” Hill, a candidate for Durango School District 9-R school board, hasn’t exactly said so, but he has insisted that followers of Jesus Christ need to take their place as leaders among nonbelievers.The school board election, featuring seven candidates across three districts, has been the battle front for several issues of importance to parents of children in the 9-R school district. The lines have been drawn on the grounds of COVID-19 masking and school visitor policies, equity for students and school district transparency. But Hill has caught attention for his views on the so-called separation of church and state.Hill was featured in a 48-second video that had all the signs of a political attack ad. Dramatic music plays in the background as the video cuts from clip to clip of Hill, assistant pastor at Pine Valley Church in Bayfield, talking about how the separation of church and state doesn’t appear anywhere in the U.S. Constitution.The short video was cut together using clips from a Pine Valley Church service that was livestreamed on YouTube on Aug. 22. It begins with a clip of Hill saying that kids don’t come with an operator’s manual, but they do come with an owner’s manual: The Bible.Harrison Wendt, a Durango resident and former City Council candidate, said he began researching the candidates for school board when he came across Hill’s Aug. 22 sermon. He put together clips into a video and shared it on Facebook. Since then, many others have shared it.“There’s people my age, 25 and younger, who would probably never think about voting in a school board election who are actually going to vote for the first time because they see how dangerous his speech is,” Wendt said in an interview Monday.“... That’s what really caught my eye, a man who speaks so highly of maintaining freedom for children and parents and then gives a sermon a month earlier about how there is no separation of church and state and how the owner’s manual to a child is the Bible,” he said.The video is also hosted on the Save 9R Facebook page, which claims to be a bipartisan effort on the part of parents, teachers and local leaders “working to defend common sense, quality leadership for our 9R School Board and to educate and inform voters.”htmlSubtitles are overlaid on screen as Hill issues his most controversial quote from the video. The video shows Hill lamenting that “we believe the lie that there’s (such a) thing as separation of church and state.”“Really?” asks Hill. “There is no separation clause anywhere.”Another clip features Hill posing two questions: “What is the church going to do? And what is the government going to do?”As the video fades to black, more text appears on screen saying “Dean Hill doesn’t believe in the separation of Church and State” and tells La Plata County voters to vote by Nov. 2.There’s more to Hill’s approximately 50-minute sermon than the separation of church and state, and Hill seems to quickly move on from the subject. But the meaning behind Hill’s words doesn’t appear to change from how they appear in the short video criticizing Hill’s take on the separation of church and state.In the full sermon, Hill leads into his comments about church and state by saying, “We need to rise up. We need to take our place where we belong.”0VideoYouTube480360He added that the only reason that “separation of church and state” was phrased the way it is, is because “they were talking about, ‘We’re getting out of the Church of England and I don’t want the Church of England being our boss.’”In an interview with The Durango Herald, Hill doubled down on the fact that the phrase “separation of church and state” doesn’t appear in the Constitution.“There’s nowhere in the Constitution where that’s said,” Hill said. “In that speech, he (President Andrew Jackson) stated ... ‘What is the church’s responsibility to help people and what is the state’s responsibility?’“... And it (the Constitution) doesn’t say that as somebody who is a member of a church who believes in Jesus Christ shouldn’t be a part of politics.”Hill is correct when he says the Constitution doesn’t prohibit members of any religious institution from participating in politics. He was also correct when he said that the phrase “separation of church and state” does not appear verbatim in the Constitution.What the Constitution does say of religion’s relationship with government is found in the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment: “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof ...”In a follow-up email asking Hill for his views about the Establishment Clause and how it relates to the separation of church and state, Hill responded by saying the Establishment Clause grants the freedom of religion. Hill said if elected to the school board, he will bring his worldview to the table just as other board members would bring theirs.“Our filters are different, but I also believe this: I’ve always been a consensus builder, I’ve always been a relationship builder,” Hill said. “My hope is that if I get in there, we can get together and come together and find the things that we agree upon rather than focusing on the things that we don’t agree upon.”Hill said the primary focus of school board members is to spend more time on the issues that are directed toward student achievement.“That’s the focus where I plan on moving toward,” Hill said. “How do we supply these skills, the strategies, the education, that these kids need to be a good workforce and a good solid citizen of the United States?”Hill is running against Richard “Rick” Petersen in the Durango 9-R school board District C election.cburney@durangoherald.com
Richard ‘Dean’ Hill also says children come with owner’s manual: The Bible
Southwest Colorado expected to receive moisture from ‘atmospheric river’ moving in from PacificWeather Service says rain needed with dryer-than-normal winter expected16001067The La Plata and San Juan mountains on Saturday are bare on the south slopes, but on Monday through Wednesday, the mountains should become covered in snow as a weather system moves through the area. (Jerry McBride/Durango Herald)A large amount of moisture from the Pacific Ocean, known as an “atmospheric river,” is headed for Southwest Colorado. “It’s basically this strong plume of moisture that comes off of the Pacific,” said Erin Walter, meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Grand Junction. “It’s like this continuous stream, almost like a jet but in the form of moisture.”Over the weekend, the atmospheric river dumped more than 5 inches of rain in the San Francisco area, Walter said. Most of the moisture from the storm system will be dropped in California over the Sierra Nevada’s and the Great Basin, with Southwest Colorado getting the last bit of that precipitation on Tuesday. “We aren’t going to see feet of snow like the Sierra Nevada’s, but we are going to see some precipitation,” Walter said. Southwest Colorado has been experiencing warm conditions, which will be a determining factor in how much precipitation falls in the region, Walter said. “We’re seeing snow amounts higher up Tuesday morning, and then as the system moves through, some colder air will move in behind it,” Walter said. 16001133A plume of moisture known as an atmospheric river is making its way across the states, and will bring rainfall to Southwest Colorado on Tuesday. (Jerry McBride/Durango Herald file)Towns along U.S. Highway 160 should expect around a quarter of an inch of rain Tuesday, with some areas potentially seeing higher, localized amounts of rainfall around half an inch. “I would expect at least a quarter of an inch for Durango, Cortez and Pagosa Springs,” Walter said. As for snow, Silverton is expected to get about an inch of powder in the city, with around 5 to 8 inches in higher elevations of the San Juan Mountains. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration released its winter outlook for temperature, precipitation and drought Thursday. NOAA said this will be the second La Niña year in a row. La Niña seasons are caused by cooler-than-average sea surface temperatures in the Tropical Pacific. 0VideoYouTube480360“The Southwest will certainly remain a region of concern as we anticipate below-normal precipitation where drought conditions continue in most areas,” said Jon Gottschalck, with NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center.Southwest Colorado is expected to have 40% to 50% higher temperatures than normal, 33% to 40% lower precipitation than normal, and drought conditions expected to worsen. “Any moisture is definitely welcomed,” Walter said. njohnson@durangoherald.com
Weather Service says rain needed with dryer-than-normal winter expected
Freshman and junior riders compete in the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships Freshman girl’s varsity race starts during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald8151300Freshman girl’s varsity race starts during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald7641300Freshman girl’s varsity race starts during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald6841300Junior varsity race starts during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald5611300Riders compete in the junior varsity girl’s race during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald6481300Emmett McManus of Durango High School competes during the freshman varsity race in the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald8131300Fans cheer on riders competing in the freshman and junior varsity boy’s and girl’s races during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9101300Fans cheer on riders competing in the freshman and junior varsity boy’s and girl’s races during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald8771300Fans cheer on riders competing in the freshman and junior varsity boy’s and girl’s races during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald8271300Fans cheer on riders competing in the freshman and junior varsity boy’s and girl’s races during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9341300Fans cheer on riders competing in the freshman and junior varsity boy’s and girl’s races during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald7901259Cedar Bremner of Durango High School competes during the freshman varsity race in the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1207950Canyon Cherney of Colorado Rocky Mountain places second in the freshman varsity race in the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald762950Jake McDill of Rocky Mountain wins the freshman varsity race in the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10901300Carter Kirkpatrick of Fairview places third in the freshman varsity race in the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1202950Cedar Bremner of Durango High School crosses the finish line during the freshman varsity race in the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1436950James Garvey of Durango High School crosses the finish line during the freshman varsity race in the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1203950Fans cheer on riders competing in the freshman and junior varsity boy’s and girl’s races during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald8671300Fans cheer on riders competing in the freshman and junior varsity boy’s and girl’s races during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald8391300Lucy Perkin competes in the freshman girl’s varsity race during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald7381300Sofia Harcek competes in the freshman girl’s varsity race during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9381300Sofia Harcek competes in the freshman girl’s varsity race during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9441300Lucy Perkins of VSSA wins the freshman girl’s varsity race during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1241950Scarlett Hardie of Grand Junction places second in the freshman girl’s varsity race during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1397950Sofia Harcek of Golden places third in the freshman girl’s varsity race during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1392950Jacob Huber of Durango High School competes in the junior varsity race during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9481300A Durango High School rider competes in the junior varsity race during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9781300Riders compete in the junior varsity race during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald6901300Riders compete in the junior varsity race during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald7681300Aidan Haack of Steamboat places second in the junior varsity race during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11101300Nico Konecny of Summit wins the junior varsity race during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald8521300The course during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships race was tough on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9421300Riders compete in the junior varsity girl’s race during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald8271300Jacob Huber of Durango High School crosses the finish line in the junior varsity race during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9181300Jacob Huber of Durango High School crosses the finish line in the junior varsity race during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald8671300Riders compete in the junior varsity girl’s race during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald8701300Riders compete in the junior varsity girl’s race during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald8871300Julia Glotfelty of Animas High School competes in the junior varsity girl’s race during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald30902013Jsophie Eschallier of High Desert Composite competes in the junior varsity girl’s race during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald974950Sage Hummon of Golden High School wins the junior varsity race in the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1327950Rose Horning of Leadville places second in the junior varsity girl’s race during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10221300Riley Huston of Golden places third in the junior varsity girl’s race during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9461300Emmett McManus of Durango High School crosses the finish line during the freshman varsity race in the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1137950Kai Lokey of Durango High School crosses the finish line during the freshman varsity race in the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1270950Fans cheer on riders competing in the freshman and junior varsity boy’s and girl’s races during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald854950Fans cheer on riders competing in the freshman and junior varsity boy’s and girl’s races during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald7271300Fans cheer on riders competing in the freshman and junior varsity boy’s and girl’s races during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald8551300Fans cheer on riders competing in the freshman and junior varsity boy’s and girl’s races during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald7521300Fans dressed up for this year’s race theme "Disco Fever" cheer on riders competing in the freshman and junior varsity boy’s and girl’s races during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald999950Fans dressed up for this year’s race theme "Disco Fever" cheer on riders competing in the freshman and junior varsity boy’s and girl’s races during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10701300Fans cheer on riders competing in the freshman and junior varsity boy’s and girl’s races during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald8671300Julia Glotfelty of Animas High School crosses the finish line in the junior varsity girl’s race during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10629501110950882950Fans dressed up for this years race theme, “Disco Fever,” cheer on riders competing in the freshman and junior varsity boy’s and girl’s races during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1044600Fans dressed up for this year’s race theme “Disco Fever” cheer on riders competing in the freshman and junior varsity boy’s and girl’s races during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald634950Fans dressed up for this year’s race theme “Disco Fever” cheer on riders competing in the freshman and junior varsity boy’s and girl’s races during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald953600Fans dressed up for this year’s race theme “Disco Fever” cheer on riders competing in the freshman and junior varsity boy’s and girl’s races during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald884950Fans dressed up for this year’s race theme “Disco Fever” cheer on riders competing in the freshman and junior varsity boy’s and girl’s races during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald8911300Fans dressed up for this year’s race theme “Disco Fever” cheer on riders competing in the freshman and junior varsity boy’s and girl’s races during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11861300Riders compete in the junior varsity race during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10741300Riders compete in the junior varsity race during the Colorado High School Cycling League’s mountain bike state championships on Saturday at Durango Mesa. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9251300
Fort Lewis College volleyball takes on South Dakota School of MinesSkyhawks win the match in five setsFort Lewis College sets their defense up on Friday while playing South Dakota School of Mines at FLC. Photo Jerry McBride/Durango Herald8911266Alexis Hobie of Fort Lewis College digs the ball on Friday while playing South Dakota School of Mines. Photo Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1247950Fort Lewis College gathers during a timeout on Friday while playing South Dakota School of Mines at FLC. Photo Jerry McBride/Durango Herald7341298Kamryn Lopez of Fort Lewis College digs the ball on Friday while playing South Dakota School of Mines at FLC. Photo Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1365950Natalia Lambos of Fort Lewis College makes a kill on Friday while playing South Dakota School of Mines at FLC. Photo Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1518950Fort Lewis College players celebrates a point on Friday while playing South Dakota School of Mines at FLC. Photo Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1133950Kamryn Lopez of Fort Lewis College digs the ball on Friday while playing South Dakota School of Mines at FLC. Photo Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1219950Giedre Tarnauskaite, Fort Lewis College head volleyball coach, is all smiles after the Skyhawks won the second set on Friday against South Dakota School of Mines at FLC. Photo Jerry McBride/Durango Herald803950Lauren Burns of Fort Lewis College makes a kill on Friday while playing South Dakota School of Mines at FLC. Photo Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1213950Avynn La Rose of Fort Lewis College sets the ball on Friday while playing South Dakota School of Mines at FLC. Photo Jerry McBride/Durango Herald864950Fort Lewis College players go up for a block on Friday while playing South Dakota School of Mines at FLC. Photo Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1076950Chailyn Swenson of Fort Lewis College goes up for a kill on Friday while playing South Dakota School of Mines at FLC. Photo Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1056950Alexis Hobie of Fort Lewis College makes a kill on Friday while playing South Dakota School of Mines at FLC. Photo Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1284950Natalia Lambos of Fort Lewis College celebrates a point on Friday while playing South Dakota School of Mines at FLC. Photo Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1240950Payton Harmann, left, and Chailyn Swenson of Fort Lewis both go after the ball on Friday while playing South Dakota School of Mines at FLC. Photo Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9041300Natalia Lambos left, and Avynn La Rose of Fort Lewis block the ball on Friday while playing South Dakota School of Mines at FLC. Photo Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1317950Natalia Lambos of Fort Lewis College taps the ball over the net on Friday while playing South Dakota School of Mines at FLC. Photo Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1154950Natalia Lambos of Fort Lewis College sets the ball on Friday while playing South Dakota School of Mines at FLC. Photo Jerry McBride/Durango Herald792950
Skyhawks win the match in five sets
Animas High School celebrates construction of new campus Julianne Marqua, a former Animas High School student, and Jesse Ogle, with iAM MUSIC, entertain the crowd Wednesday as part of a celebration for AHS’s new campus that is under construction on the Fort Lewis College campus. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10671600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Golden shovels are laid out Wednesday for the ground breaking ceremony during the Animas High School celebration of its new campus on the Fort Lewis College campus. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10931600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Sean Woytek, head of school at Animas High School, welcomes people Wednesday at a celebration for AHS’s new campus that is under construction on the Fort Lewis College campus. Construction on the 3.2-acre parcel will house the new $20 million Animas High School, south of the Bader-Snyder Residence Halls at FLC. The 40,500-square-foot building will feature two levels, with the common area extending through the central spine of the building and culminating in an atrium. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10901600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Animas High School student Lana Bodewes, 16, hugs the school mascot, an osprey hawk, with student Maddie Tharp, 15, inside the costume on Wednesday. AHS is celebrating its new campus that is under construction at Fort Lewis College. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald916950Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Construction continues Wednesday during the Animas High School celebration of its new campus located on the Fort Lewis College campus. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10521600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral People gather Wednesday a celebration of the new Animas High School campus that is under construction at Fort Lewis College. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9721587Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Animas High School students interview Jenni Trujillo, dean of education at Fort Lewis College, and Cheryl Nixon, provost and vice president for academic affairs at Fort Lewis College, on Wednesday during a celebration of AHS’s campus. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9501300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Members of the Sky Hawk Nation drum group sing Wednesday during a celebration of the new Animas High School campus at Fort Lewis College. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11171600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Animas High School color guard wait to perform Wednesday during a celebration of Animas High School’s new located at Fort Lewis College. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald12041600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral
Snow storm moves through the San Juan Mountains on TuesdayAn ice and snow-packed Coal Bank Pass on U.S. Highway 550 had drivers slowing down Tuesday as a storm moves through the San Juan Mountains north of Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10451584Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Businesses and residents clear snow Tuesday north of Durango as a winter storm moves through the area. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10501600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral A winter storm moves through the San Juan Mountains on Tuesday north of Durango leaving several inches of snow. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10811600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral A winter storm moves through the San Juan Mountains on Tuesday north of Durango leaving several inches of snow. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10671600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral A winter storm moves through the San Juan Mountains on Tuesday north of Durango leaving several inches of snow. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10681300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Purgatory Resort received several inches of snow Tuesday morning as a winter storm moves through the area. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10521600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Cold temps and high winds took a toll on fall colors early Tuesday in Southwest Colorado. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10671600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Businesses and residents clear snow Tuesday north of Durango as a winter storm moves through the area. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11201600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Purgatory Resort received several inches of snow on Tuesday morning as a winter storm moves through the area. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9411600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Horses graze in a snow covered pasture on Tuesday north of Durango as a winter storm moves through the area. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10441600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral A winter storm took a toll on fall colors early Tuesday in Southwest Colorado. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10791600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Clouds lift from the West Needles on Tuesday morning to reveal snow-covered San Juan Mountains north of Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10571600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Up to a foot of snow was reported in some places early Tuesday in the San Juan Mountains. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10081600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Cold temps and high winds took a toll on fall colors early Tuesday in Southwest Colorado. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10671600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Clouds lift from the West Needles on Tuesday morning to reveal snow-covered San Juan Mountains north of Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9821600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Purgatory Resort received several inches of snow Tuesday morning as a winter storm moves through the area. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10901600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Horses graze in a snow-covered pasture Tuesday north of Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10441600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Drivers in the lower elevations on U.S. Highway 550 encountered wet roads as a winter storm moves through the San Juan Mountains on Tuesday north of Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10741600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Tourists from the D.C. area photograph snow-covered trees Tuesday in the San Juan Mountains north of Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10531600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Drivers in the lower elevations on U.S. Highway 550 encountered wet roads as a winter storm moves through the San Juan Mountains on Tuesday north of Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10261600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral
Durango High School takes on Harrison High SchoolDemons win 42-0 to begin league playDurango High School plays some tough defense against Harrison High School on Friday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9321300Walter Stauffer of Durango High School sacks Harrison High School’s quarterback on Friday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1016950Durango High School’s defense swarms to make a tackle against Harrison High School on Friday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9781300Durango High School gets ready to take on Harrison High School on Friday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald7531300Sam Carozza of Durango High School kicks the the ball off to Harrison High School on Friday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1084950Ean Goodwin of Durango High School returns an interception for a touchdown against Harrison High School on Friday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald8811300Tyler Harms of Durango High School passes the ball while playing Harrison High School on Friday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9071300Tyler Harms of Durango High School hands off the ball while playing Harrison High School on Friday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10281300Zach Haber of Durango High School scores a touchdown while playing Harrison High School on Friday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald994950Zach Haber of Durango High School looks for an opening while playing Harrison High School on Friday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9591300Jordan Stanley of Durango High School runs the ball for a big gain while playing Harrison High School on Friday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1178950Tyler Harms of Durango High School runs the ball while playing Harrison High School on Friday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald947950Tagert Bardin, right, celebrates his kickoff return touchdown against Harrison High School on Friday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald962950Tagert Bardin of Durango High School breaks away on the opening kickoff to score a touchdown against Harrison High School on Friday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1308950
Demons win 42-0 to begin league play
Mark Redwine sentenced for the murder of his sonCory Redwine and his mother Elaine Hall wait for the start of a sentencing hearing Friday for Mark Redwine, who was convicted of killing his 13-year-old son, Dylan. A jury found Redwine guilty in July of second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in the death. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11321600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Cory Redwine reads a statement Friday during the sentencing hearing for his father, Mark Redwine, who was found guilty in July of second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in death. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald893950Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Elaine Hall reads a statement and walks past Mark Redwine on Friday during the sentencing for Mark Redwine. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11241300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Brandon Redwine, Dylan's half-brother, reads a statement Friday during the sentencing hearing for Mark Redwine at the La Plata County Courthouse. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald12411300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine is led out of the courtroom in shackles Friday after being sentenced to 48 years in prison for killing his son, Dylan. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald13831300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine is led out of the courtroom in shackles Friday after being sentenced to 48 years in prison. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald15281300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine chose to remain silent at Friday’s sentencing hearing. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald13471300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Elaine Hall said she never thought her ex-husband would take out his frustration on their 13-year-old son, Dylan. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10531600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine enters the courtroom Friday in 6th Judicial District Court. A jury found Redwine guilty in July of second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in the death. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald16931300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine wore a suit and tie to court during his five-week jury trial but appeared in jail garbs Friday at his sentencing hearing, where he was given 48 years in prison. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10981600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine enters the courtroom Friday. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald19251300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral District Attorney Christian Champagne speaks with his prosecution team during the sentencing hearing for Mark Redwine. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11641600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral District Attorney Christian Champagne said Mark Redwine took Dylan’s life and deprived his family and the world from the possibilities of what he could have become. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10531600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Family members react after District Judge Jeffrey Wilson announced a 48-year prison sentence for Mark Redwine, the father convicted of killing his 13-year-old son, Dylan. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11001300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Jeffrey R. Wilson, chief judge of the 6th Judicial District, addresses Mark Redwine on Friday. The judge handed down a 48-year-prison sentence for second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in death. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11741300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine stands as he answers a question from District Judge Jeffrey Wilson during a sentencing hearing Friday in Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1331950Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine stands between his defense team as he listens to District Judge Jeffrey Wilson announce his sentence on Friday. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald19171300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine stands with his defense team Friday as District Judge Jeffrey Wilson hands down a 48-year prison sentence. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11831600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine declined to speak Friday during his sentencing hearing after being found guilty of second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in death. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10441600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine is lead out of the courthouse Friday after receiving a 48-year prison sentence. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald15091300
VIDEO: Watch the sentencing hearing for Mark Redwine0VideoYouTube4803609501205Mark Redwine was sentenced Friday, Oct. 8, 2021, to 48 years in prison after being found guilty of second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in the death of his 13-year-old son, Dylan.
Mark Redwine was sentenced Friday, Oct. 8, 2021, to 48 years in prison after being found guilty ...
Colorado father sentenced to prison for killing 13-year-old son, Dylan RedwineMark Redwine, 60, was found guilty of second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in death13001347Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine sits in shackles Friday at the La Plata County Courthouse during a sentencing for killing his 13-year-old son, Dylan. A jury found Redwine guilty in July of second-degree murder and child abuse causing the death. (Jerry McBride/Durango Herald)Mark Redwine, the Vallecito father who was found guilty this summer of killing his 13-year-old son, Dylan, was sentenced Friday to 48 years in prison.“I have trouble remembering a convicted criminal defendant that has shown such an utter lack of remorse for his criminal behavior,” said 6th Judicial District Court Judge Jeffery Wilson, in handing down the maximum penalty.Redwine, wearing an orange, jail-issued jumpsuit, declined to speak; his attorneys said he plans to appeal.10041449DylanBut in a pre-sentence investigation, which looks into the legal and social background of convicted criminals and gives them a chance to weigh in, Redwine wrote a few terse words while maintaining his innocence. Judge Wilson read those comments into the record Friday.“Innocent of all charges. Miscarriage of justice. Fake conviction. Sham trial,” Redwine wrote. “... I take this circumstance very seriously and want to make clear that I too have lost a child I love more than life itself. I will fight for true justice, not for myself but for Dylan. I have always shown remorse for the things that I am guilty of. Stand against fake justice.”15421160DylanElaine Hall, Dylan’s mother, said she she is pleased with Friday’s outcome. “It’s justice as far as justice can go,“ she said. “... There will never be enough time for taking Dylan’s life, but at least he hopefully won’t get out. Hopefully he’ll die in prison.”Redwine, 60, was facing 16 to 48 years in prison after a 12-person jury found him guilty July 16 of second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in death.Prosecutors asked the court to sentence Redwine to the full 48 years, citing several aggravating circumstances, including that Redwine killed his own son, misled law enforcement and has shown no remorse.“He stands before you refusing to accept responsibility, showing no remorse, reflecting that same cold-hearted murderer’s heart that killed Dylan Redwine,” said District Attorney Christian Champagne. “Your honor, that’s the ultimate aggravating factor that you should consider. And that alone will justify imposition of the maximum sentence in this case – 48 years for both counts.”13001174Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Jeffrey R. Wilson, chief judge of the 6th Judicial District, addresses Mark Redwine on Friday at the La Plata County Courthouse in Durango. Wilson sentenced Redwine to 48 years in prison. (Jerry McBride/Durango Herald)In addressing Redwine, Wilson said the evidence against him is “overwhelming.” “First of all, you killed your son, a 13-year-old boy. At 13, he’s still a little boy,” Wilson said. “As the father, it’s your obligation to protect your son, keep him from harm. Instead of that, you inflicted enough injury on him to kill him in your living room.“After the passion of whatever caused you to act the way you did subsided, you didn’t think about Dylan. You thought about yourself, you sanitized the crime scene, you hid Dylan’s body and you went so far as to remove his head from the rest of his body.”Wilson said Redwine’s efforts to conceal Dylan’s body and lie about what happened caused suffering for Dylan’s family and the entire community. His actions deprived Dylan the opportunity to grow up, fall in love, get married and have children, the judge said.In handing down the maximum penalty, Wilson said Redwine takes “absolutely no responsibly” for what he did to Dylan and needs to be removed from society for “a long period of time.”13001383Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine is led out of the courtroom in shackles Friday after being sentenced to 48 years in prison for killing his 13-year-old son, Dylan. A jury found Redwine guilty in July of second-degree murder and child abuse causing death. (Jerry McBride/Durango Herald)Public defense lawyer John Moran made several legal arguments, some that will likely show up in a future appeal. He also asked that certain statements and findings be stricken from the pre-sentence investigation. “Mr. Redwine loved Dylan with all his heart,” Moran said. “The depth of grief Dylan’s loved ones have experienced may never leave a high-water mark. ... Mr. Redwine is eager for fair and impartial review by a higher court. He is appealing and wishes to make no further record here.”The sentencing hearing caps a nearly nine-year homicide investigation that began in November 2012, when Dylan disappeared while on a court-ordered visit to see his father.Prosecutors surmised that Redwine flew into a fit of rage and murdered his son after the boy confronted him about compromising photos. Defense lawyers said Dylan was alive the morning of Nov. 19, 2012 – the day he went missing. His father ran errands in town, and when he returned he found the boy missing – a bowl of cereal on the table and the television turned to Nickelodeon.They suggested a stranger may have harmed Dylan, or that wildlife attacked him while he was out walking.Text messages sent by Dylan to friends and family indicate the boy didn’t want to spend the Thanksgiving holiday with his father. Their relationship had soured in recent months, especially after Dylan found photos of his father wearing women’s lingerie while eating what appeared to be feces from a diaper, according to testimony presented during the five-week trial.0VideoYouTube480360Dylan’s disappearance set off a massive search in the rugged mountains north of Redwine’s home in Southwest Colorado. In the months that followed, community members and law enforcement organized multiple searches, combing the woods for clues.Law enforcement executed several search warrants on Redwine’s home. Forensic testing found traces of Dylan’s blood in his father’s living room, and a cadaver dog detected the recent presence of a corpse in the living room and in the bed of Redwine’s pickup truck.It wasn’t until June 2013 when the first partial remains of Dylan’s body were found about 8 miles up Middle Mountain Road, only a few miles northeast of Redwine’s home, as the crow flies.In November 2015, a pair of hikers found Dylan’s skull about 1½ miles farther up the road. Forensic experts testified the skull had what appeared to be knife markings, and wildlife experts said no animal inhabiting this area would have transported a skull that far from the other remains.36172036Mark Redwine and Elaine Hall appeared on “The Dr. Phil Show” Feb. 26 and 27 in 2013. Redwine, Hall and Dylan’s older brother, Cory Redwine, appeared on the show again May 20, 2015. Hall appeared a third time on “Dr. Phil” to provide an update on the case March 22, 2016. (Durango Herald file)As the case wore on, it gained national and international attention, including segments on “Nancy Grace,” and “Investigation Discovery.” Elaine, Cory and Mark appeared on a two-part episode of the “Dr. Phil” show, which ended with Redwine refusing to take a lie detector test. (At least five television news channels were in town for Friday’s sentencing hearing.)Law enforcement received numerous “tips” from psychics who claimed to know where Dylan’s remains could be found, and as a matter of due diligence, law enforcement had to follow up on many of them.The case was largely based on circumstantial evidence. As such, prosecutors decided to convene a grand jury to decide whether there was enough evidence to issue an indictment.The La Plata County grand jury issued its indictment in July 2017, and Redwine, a truck driver, was arrested two days later in Bellingham, Washington.0VideoYouTube480360The judicial process was fraught with delays, especially as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, which caused at least three significant delays. Prior to that, one of Redwine’s attorney’s faced his own legal challenges and was taken off the case, which caused delays. No charges were ever filed against the attorney, and he rejoined the case But after a five-week trial, which included dozens of witnesses, hundreds of pieces of evidence and volumes of discovery, jurors found Redwine guilty on both counts outlined in the indictment.shane@durangoherald.comCory Redwine and his mother Elaine Hall wait for the start of a sentencing hearing Friday for Mark Redwine, who was convicted of killing his 13-year-old son, Dylan. A jury found Redwine guilty in July of second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in the death. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11321600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Cory Redwine reads a statement Friday during the sentencing hearing for his father, Mark Redwine, who was found guilty in July of second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in death. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald893950Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Elaine Hall reads a statement and walks past Mark Redwine on Friday during the sentencing for Mark Redwine. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11241300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Brandon Redwine, Dylan's half-brother, reads a statement Friday during the sentencing hearing for Mark Redwine at the La Plata County Courthouse. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald12411300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine is led out of the courtroom in shackles Friday after being sentenced to 48 years in prison for killing his son, Dylan. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald13831300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine is led out of the courtroom in shackles Friday after being sentenced to 48 years in prison. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald15281300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine chose to remain silent at Friday’s sentencing hearing. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald13471300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Elaine Hall said she never thought her ex-husband would take out his frustration on their 13-year-old son, Dylan. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10531600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine enters the courtroom Friday in 6th Judicial District Court. A jury found Redwine guilty in July of second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in the death. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald16931300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine wore a suit and tie to court during his five-week jury trial but appeared in jail garbs Friday at his sentencing hearing, where he was given 48 years in prison. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10981600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine enters the courtroom Friday. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald19251300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral District Attorney Christian Champagne speaks with his prosecution team during the sentencing hearing for Mark Redwine. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11641600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral District Attorney Christian Champagne said Mark Redwine took Dylan’s life and deprived his family and the world from the possibilities of what he could have become. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10531600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Family members react after District Judge Jeffrey Wilson announced a 48-year prison sentence for Mark Redwine, the father convicted of killing his 13-year-old son, Dylan. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11001300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Jeffrey R. Wilson, chief judge of the 6th Judicial District, addresses Mark Redwine on Friday. The judge handed down a 48-year-prison sentence for second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in death. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11741300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine stands as he answers a question from District Judge Jeffrey Wilson during a sentencing hearing Friday in Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1331950Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine stands between his defense team as he listens to District Judge Jeffrey Wilson announce his sentence on Friday. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald19171300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine stands with his defense team Friday as District Judge Jeffrey Wilson hands down a 48-year prison sentence. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11831600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine declined to speak Friday during his sentencing hearing after being found guilty of second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in death. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10441600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine is lead out of the courthouse Friday after receiving a 48-year prison sentence. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald15091300
Mark Redwine, 60, was found guilty of second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in death