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Animas High School celebrates construction of new campus Julianne Marqua, a former Animas High School student, and Jesse Ogle, with iAM MUSIC, entertain the crowd Wednesday as part of a celebration for AHS’s new campus that is under construction on the Fort Lewis College campus. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10671600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Golden shovels are laid out Wednesday for the ground breaking ceremony during the Animas High School celebration of its new campus on the Fort Lewis College campus. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10931600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Sean Woytek, head of school at Animas High School, welcomes people Wednesday at a celebration for AHS’s new campus that is under construction on the Fort Lewis College campus. Construction on the 3.2-acre parcel will house the new $20 million Animas High School, south of the Bader-Snyder Residence Halls at FLC. The 40,500-square-foot building will feature two levels, with the common area extending through the central spine of the building and culminating in an atrium. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10901600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Animas High School student Lana Bodewes, 16, hugs the school mascot, an osprey hawk, with student Maddie Tharp, 15, inside the costume on Wednesday. AHS is celebrating its new campus that is under construction at Fort Lewis College. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald916950Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Construction continues Wednesday during the Animas High School celebration of its new campus located on the Fort Lewis College campus. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10521600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral People gather Wednesday a celebration of the new Animas High School campus that is under construction at Fort Lewis College. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9721587Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Animas High School students interview Jenni Trujillo, dean of education at Fort Lewis College, and Cheryl Nixon, provost and vice president for academic affairs at Fort Lewis College, on Wednesday during a celebration of AHS’s campus. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9501300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Members of the Sky Hawk Nation drum group sing Wednesday during a celebration of the new Animas High School campus at Fort Lewis College. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11171600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Animas High School color guard wait to perform Wednesday during a celebration of Animas High School’s new located at Fort Lewis College. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald12041600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral
Snow storm moves through the San Juan Mountains on TuesdayAn ice and snow-packed Coal Bank Pass on U.S. Highway 550 had drivers slowing down Tuesday as a storm moves through the San Juan Mountains north of Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10451584Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Businesses and residents clear snow Tuesday north of Durango as a winter storm moves through the area. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10501600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral A winter storm moves through the San Juan Mountains on Tuesday north of Durango leaving several inches of snow. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10811600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral A winter storm moves through the San Juan Mountains on Tuesday north of Durango leaving several inches of snow. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10671600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral A winter storm moves through the San Juan Mountains on Tuesday north of Durango leaving several inches of snow. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10681300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Purgatory Resort received several inches of snow Tuesday morning as a winter storm moves through the area. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10521600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Cold temps and high winds took a toll on fall colors early Tuesday in Southwest Colorado. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10671600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Businesses and residents clear snow Tuesday north of Durango as a winter storm moves through the area. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11201600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Purgatory Resort received several inches of snow on Tuesday morning as a winter storm moves through the area. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9411600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Horses graze in a snow covered pasture on Tuesday north of Durango as a winter storm moves through the area. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10441600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral A winter storm took a toll on fall colors early Tuesday in Southwest Colorado. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10791600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Clouds lift from the West Needles on Tuesday morning to reveal snow-covered San Juan Mountains north of Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10571600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Up to a foot of snow was reported in some places early Tuesday in the San Juan Mountains. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10081600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Cold temps and high winds took a toll on fall colors early Tuesday in Southwest Colorado. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10671600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Clouds lift from the West Needles on Tuesday morning to reveal snow-covered San Juan Mountains north of Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9821600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Purgatory Resort received several inches of snow Tuesday morning as a winter storm moves through the area. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10901600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Horses graze in a snow-covered pasture Tuesday north of Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10441600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Drivers in the lower elevations on U.S. Highway 550 encountered wet roads as a winter storm moves through the San Juan Mountains on Tuesday north of Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10741600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Tourists from the D.C. area photograph snow-covered trees Tuesday in the San Juan Mountains north of Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10531600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Drivers in the lower elevations on U.S. Highway 550 encountered wet roads as a winter storm moves through the San Juan Mountains on Tuesday north of Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10261600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral
Durango High School takes on Harrison High SchoolDemons win 42-0 to begin league playDurango High School plays some tough defense against Harrison High School on Friday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9321300Walter Stauffer of Durango High School sacks Harrison High School’s quarterback on Friday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1016950Durango High School’s defense swarms to make a tackle against Harrison High School on Friday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9781300Durango High School gets ready to take on Harrison High School on Friday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald7531300Sam Carozza of Durango High School kicks the the ball off to Harrison High School on Friday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1084950Ean Goodwin of Durango High School returns an interception for a touchdown against Harrison High School on Friday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald8811300Tyler Harms of Durango High School passes the ball while playing Harrison High School on Friday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9071300Tyler Harms of Durango High School hands off the ball while playing Harrison High School on Friday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10281300Zach Haber of Durango High School scores a touchdown while playing Harrison High School on Friday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald994950Zach Haber of Durango High School looks for an opening while playing Harrison High School on Friday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9591300Jordan Stanley of Durango High School runs the ball for a big gain while playing Harrison High School on Friday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1178950Tyler Harms of Durango High School runs the ball while playing Harrison High School on Friday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald947950Tagert Bardin, right, celebrates his kickoff return touchdown against Harrison High School on Friday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald962950Tagert Bardin of Durango High School breaks away on the opening kickoff to score a touchdown against Harrison High School on Friday night at DHS. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1308950
Demons win 42-0 to begin league play
Mark Redwine sentenced for the murder of his sonCory Redwine and his mother Elaine Hall wait for the start of a sentencing hearing Friday for Mark Redwine, who was convicted of killing his 13-year-old son, Dylan. A jury found Redwine guilty in July of second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in the death. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11321600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Cory Redwine reads a statement Friday during the sentencing hearing for his father, Mark Redwine, who was found guilty in July of second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in death. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald893950Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Elaine Hall reads a statement and walks past Mark Redwine on Friday during the sentencing for Mark Redwine. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11241300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Brandon Redwine, Dylan's half-brother, reads a statement Friday during the sentencing hearing for Mark Redwine at the La Plata County Courthouse. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald12411300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine is led out of the courtroom in shackles Friday after being sentenced to 48 years in prison for killing his son, Dylan. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald13831300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine is led out of the courtroom in shackles Friday after being sentenced to 48 years in prison. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald15281300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine chose to remain silent at Friday’s sentencing hearing. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald13471300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Elaine Hall said she never thought her ex-husband would take out his frustration on their 13-year-old son, Dylan. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10531600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine enters the courtroom Friday in 6th Judicial District Court. A jury found Redwine guilty in July of second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in the death. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald16931300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine wore a suit and tie to court during his five-week jury trial but appeared in jail garbs Friday at his sentencing hearing, where he was given 48 years in prison. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10981600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine enters the courtroom Friday. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald19251300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral District Attorney Christian Champagne speaks with his prosecution team during the sentencing hearing for Mark Redwine. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11641600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral District Attorney Christian Champagne said Mark Redwine took Dylan’s life and deprived his family and the world from the possibilities of what he could have become. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10531600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Family members react after District Judge Jeffrey Wilson announced a 48-year prison sentence for Mark Redwine, the father convicted of killing his 13-year-old son, Dylan. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11001300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Jeffrey R. Wilson, chief judge of the 6th Judicial District, addresses Mark Redwine on Friday. The judge handed down a 48-year-prison sentence for second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in death. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11741300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine stands as he answers a question from District Judge Jeffrey Wilson during a sentencing hearing Friday in Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1331950Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine stands between his defense team as he listens to District Judge Jeffrey Wilson announce his sentence on Friday. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald19171300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine stands with his defense team Friday as District Judge Jeffrey Wilson hands down a 48-year prison sentence. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11831600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine declined to speak Friday during his sentencing hearing after being found guilty of second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in death. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10441600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine is lead out of the courthouse Friday after receiving a 48-year prison sentence. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald15091300
VIDEO: Watch the sentencing hearing for Mark Redwine0VideoYouTube4803609501205Mark Redwine was sentenced Friday, Oct. 8, 2021, to 48 years in prison after being found guilty of second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in the death of his 13-year-old son, Dylan.
Mark Redwine was sentenced Friday, Oct. 8, 2021, to 48 years in prison after being found guilty ...
Colorado father sentenced to prison for killing 13-year-old son, Dylan RedwineMark Redwine, 60, was found guilty of second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in death13001347Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine sits in shackles Friday at the La Plata County Courthouse during a sentencing for killing his 13-year-old son, Dylan. A jury found Redwine guilty in July of second-degree murder and child abuse causing the death. (Jerry McBride/Durango Herald)Mark Redwine, the Vallecito father who was found guilty this summer of killing his 13-year-old son, Dylan, was sentenced Friday to 48 years in prison.“I have trouble remembering a convicted criminal defendant that has shown such an utter lack of remorse for his criminal behavior,” said 6th Judicial District Court Judge Jeffery Wilson, in handing down the maximum penalty.Redwine, wearing an orange, jail-issued jumpsuit, declined to speak; his attorneys said he plans to appeal.10041449DylanBut in a pre-sentence investigation, which looks into the legal and social background of convicted criminals and gives them a chance to weigh in, Redwine wrote a few terse words while maintaining his innocence. Judge Wilson read those comments into the record Friday.“Innocent of all charges. Miscarriage of justice. Fake conviction. Sham trial,” Redwine wrote. “... I take this circumstance very seriously and want to make clear that I too have lost a child I love more than life itself. I will fight for true justice, not for myself but for Dylan. I have always shown remorse for the things that I am guilty of. Stand against fake justice.”15421160DylanElaine Hall, Dylan’s mother, said she she is pleased with Friday’s outcome. “It’s justice as far as justice can go,“ she said. “... There will never be enough time for taking Dylan’s life, but at least he hopefully won’t get out. Hopefully he’ll die in prison.”Redwine, 60, was facing 16 to 48 years in prison after a 12-person jury found him guilty July 16 of second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in death.Prosecutors asked the court to sentence Redwine to the full 48 years, citing several aggravating circumstances, including that Redwine killed his own son, misled law enforcement and has shown no remorse.“He stands before you refusing to accept responsibility, showing no remorse, reflecting that same cold-hearted murderer’s heart that killed Dylan Redwine,” said District Attorney Christian Champagne. “Your honor, that’s the ultimate aggravating factor that you should consider. And that alone will justify imposition of the maximum sentence in this case – 48 years for both counts.”13001174Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Jeffrey R. Wilson, chief judge of the 6th Judicial District, addresses Mark Redwine on Friday at the La Plata County Courthouse in Durango. Wilson sentenced Redwine to 48 years in prison. (Jerry McBride/Durango Herald)In addressing Redwine, Wilson said the evidence against him is “overwhelming.” “First of all, you killed your son, a 13-year-old boy. At 13, he’s still a little boy,” Wilson said. “As the father, it’s your obligation to protect your son, keep him from harm. Instead of that, you inflicted enough injury on him to kill him in your living room.“After the passion of whatever caused you to act the way you did subsided, you didn’t think about Dylan. You thought about yourself, you sanitized the crime scene, you hid Dylan’s body and you went so far as to remove his head from the rest of his body.”Wilson said Redwine’s efforts to conceal Dylan’s body and lie about what happened caused suffering for Dylan’s family and the entire community. His actions deprived Dylan the opportunity to grow up, fall in love, get married and have children, the judge said.In handing down the maximum penalty, Wilson said Redwine takes “absolutely no responsibly” for what he did to Dylan and needs to be removed from society for “a long period of time.”13001383Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine is led out of the courtroom in shackles Friday after being sentenced to 48 years in prison for killing his 13-year-old son, Dylan. A jury found Redwine guilty in July of second-degree murder and child abuse causing death. (Jerry McBride/Durango Herald)Public defense lawyer John Moran made several legal arguments, some that will likely show up in a future appeal. He also asked that certain statements and findings be stricken from the pre-sentence investigation. “Mr. Redwine loved Dylan with all his heart,” Moran said. “The depth of grief Dylan’s loved ones have experienced may never leave a high-water mark. ... Mr. Redwine is eager for fair and impartial review by a higher court. He is appealing and wishes to make no further record here.”The sentencing hearing caps a nearly nine-year homicide investigation that began in November 2012, when Dylan disappeared while on a court-ordered visit to see his father.Prosecutors surmised that Redwine flew into a fit of rage and murdered his son after the boy confronted him about compromising photos. Defense lawyers said Dylan was alive the morning of Nov. 19, 2012 – the day he went missing. His father ran errands in town, and when he returned he found the boy missing – a bowl of cereal on the table and the television turned to Nickelodeon.They suggested a stranger may have harmed Dylan, or that wildlife attacked him while he was out walking.Text messages sent by Dylan to friends and family indicate the boy didn’t want to spend the Thanksgiving holiday with his father. Their relationship had soured in recent months, especially after Dylan found photos of his father wearing women’s lingerie while eating what appeared to be feces from a diaper, according to testimony presented during the five-week trial.0VideoYouTube480360Dylan’s disappearance set off a massive search in the rugged mountains north of Redwine’s home in Southwest Colorado. In the months that followed, community members and law enforcement organized multiple searches, combing the woods for clues.Law enforcement executed several search warrants on Redwine’s home. Forensic testing found traces of Dylan’s blood in his father’s living room, and a cadaver dog detected the recent presence of a corpse in the living room and in the bed of Redwine’s pickup truck.It wasn’t until June 2013 when the first partial remains of Dylan’s body were found about 8 miles up Middle Mountain Road, only a few miles northeast of Redwine’s home, as the crow flies.In November 2015, a pair of hikers found Dylan’s skull about 1½ miles farther up the road. Forensic experts testified the skull had what appeared to be knife markings, and wildlife experts said no animal inhabiting this area would have transported a skull that far from the other remains.36172036Mark Redwine and Elaine Hall appeared on “The Dr. Phil Show” Feb. 26 and 27 in 2013. Redwine, Hall and Dylan’s older brother, Cory Redwine, appeared on the show again May 20, 2015. Hall appeared a third time on “Dr. Phil” to provide an update on the case March 22, 2016. (Durango Herald file)As the case wore on, it gained national and international attention, including segments on “Nancy Grace,” and “Investigation Discovery.” Elaine, Cory and Mark appeared on a two-part episode of the “Dr. Phil” show, which ended with Redwine refusing to take a lie detector test. (At least five television news channels were in town for Friday’s sentencing hearing.)Law enforcement received numerous “tips” from psychics who claimed to know where Dylan’s remains could be found, and as a matter of due diligence, law enforcement had to follow up on many of them.The case was largely based on circumstantial evidence. As such, prosecutors decided to convene a grand jury to decide whether there was enough evidence to issue an indictment.The La Plata County grand jury issued its indictment in July 2017, and Redwine, a truck driver, was arrested two days later in Bellingham, Washington.0VideoYouTube480360The judicial process was fraught with delays, especially as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, which caused at least three significant delays. Prior to that, one of Redwine’s attorney’s faced his own legal challenges and was taken off the case, which caused delays. No charges were ever filed against the attorney, and he rejoined the case But after a five-week trial, which included dozens of witnesses, hundreds of pieces of evidence and volumes of discovery, jurors found Redwine guilty on both counts outlined in the indictment.shane@durangoherald.comCory Redwine and his mother Elaine Hall wait for the start of a sentencing hearing Friday for Mark Redwine, who was convicted of killing his 13-year-old son, Dylan. A jury found Redwine guilty in July of second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in the death. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11321600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Cory Redwine reads a statement Friday during the sentencing hearing for his father, Mark Redwine, who was found guilty in July of second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in death. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald893950Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Elaine Hall reads a statement and walks past Mark Redwine on Friday during the sentencing for Mark Redwine. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11241300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Brandon Redwine, Dylan's half-brother, reads a statement Friday during the sentencing hearing for Mark Redwine at the La Plata County Courthouse. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald12411300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine is led out of the courtroom in shackles Friday after being sentenced to 48 years in prison for killing his son, Dylan. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald13831300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine is led out of the courtroom in shackles Friday after being sentenced to 48 years in prison. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald15281300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine chose to remain silent at Friday’s sentencing hearing. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald13471300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Elaine Hall said she never thought her ex-husband would take out his frustration on their 13-year-old son, Dylan. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10531600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine enters the courtroom Friday in 6th Judicial District Court. A jury found Redwine guilty in July of second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in the death. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald16931300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine wore a suit and tie to court during his five-week jury trial but appeared in jail garbs Friday at his sentencing hearing, where he was given 48 years in prison. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10981600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine enters the courtroom Friday. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald19251300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral District Attorney Christian Champagne speaks with his prosecution team during the sentencing hearing for Mark Redwine. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11641600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral District Attorney Christian Champagne said Mark Redwine took Dylan’s life and deprived his family and the world from the possibilities of what he could have become. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10531600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Family members react after District Judge Jeffrey Wilson announced a 48-year prison sentence for Mark Redwine, the father convicted of killing his 13-year-old son, Dylan. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11001300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Jeffrey R. Wilson, chief judge of the 6th Judicial District, addresses Mark Redwine on Friday. The judge handed down a 48-year-prison sentence for second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in death. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11741300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine stands as he answers a question from District Judge Jeffrey Wilson during a sentencing hearing Friday in Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1331950Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine stands between his defense team as he listens to District Judge Jeffrey Wilson announce his sentence on Friday. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald19171300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine stands with his defense team Friday as District Judge Jeffrey Wilson hands down a 48-year prison sentence. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11831600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine declined to speak Friday during his sentencing hearing after being found guilty of second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in death. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10441600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine is lead out of the courthouse Friday after receiving a 48-year prison sentence. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald15091300
Mark Redwine, 60, was found guilty of second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in death
Photos: The Cowboy Gathering Parade returns for 2021The 2021 Cowboy Gathering parade passes the Strater Hotel on Saturday morning heading up Main Avenue with four-legged animals of all kinds. The parade was canceled last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9991600Participants in the 2021 Cowboy Gathering parade make their way up Main Avenue on Saturday morning with four-legged animals of all kinds. The parade was canceled last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald8951300Participants in the 2021 Cowboy Gathering parade make their way up Main Avenue on Saturday morning with four-legged animals of all kinds. The parade was canceled last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald8671300Participants in the 2021 Cowboy Gathering parade make their way up Main Avenue on Saturday morning with four-legged animals of all kinds. The parade was canceled last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald8361300Participants in the 2021 Cowboy Gathering parade make their way up Main Avenue on Saturday morning with four-legged animals of all kinds. The parade was canceled last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1005950Participants in the 2021 Cowboy Gathering parade make their way up Main Avenue on Saturday morning with four-legged animals of all kinds. The parade was canceled last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1369947Participants in the 2021 Cowboy Gathering parade make their way up Main Avenue on Saturday morning with four-legged animals of all kinds. The parade was canceled last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald7391300Participants in the 2021 Cowboy Gathering parade make their way up Main Avenue on Saturday morning with four-legged animals of all kinds. The parade was canceled last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9021300Participants in the 2021 Cowboy Gathering parade make their way up Main Avenue on Saturday morning with four-legged animals of all kinds. The parade was canceled last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald8011300Participants in the 2021 Cowboy Gathering parade make their way up Main Avenue on Saturday morning with four-legged animals of all kinds. The parade was canceled last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald6951266Participants in the 2021 Cowboy Gathering parade make their way up Main Avenue on Saturday morning with four-legged animals of all kinds. The parade was canceled last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald876950Participants in the 2021 Cowboy Gathering parade make their way up Main Avenue on Saturday morning with four-legged animals of all kinds. The parade was canceled last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1281950Participants in the 2021 Cowboy Gathering parade make their way up Main Avenue on Saturday morning with four-legged animals of all kinds. The parade was canceled last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald12161600Participants in the 2021 Cowboy Gathering parade make their way up Main Avenue on Saturday morning with four-legged animals of all kinds. The parade was canceled last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1016950Participants in the 2021 Cowboy Gathering parade make their way up Main Avenue on Saturday morning with four-legged animals of all kinds. The parade was canceled last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11021300Participants in the 2021 Cowboy Gathering parade make their way up Main Avenue on Saturday morning with four-legged animals of all kinds. The parade was canceled last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald8691300Participants in the 2021 Cowboy Gathering parade make their way up Main Avenue on Saturday morning with four-legged animals of all kinds. The parade was canceled last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald8551300Participants in the 2021 Cowboy Gathering parade make their way up Main Avenue on Saturday morning with four-legged animals of all kinds. The parade was canceled last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald8411300Participants in the 2021 Cowboy Gathering parade make their way up Main Avenue on Saturday morning with four-legged animals of all kinds. The parade was canceled last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9761300Participants in the 2021 Cowboy Gathering parade make their way up Main Avenue on Saturday morning with four-legged animals of all kinds. The parade was canceled last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9421300Participants in the 2021 Cowboy Gathering parade make their way up Main Avenue on Saturday morning with four-legged animals of all kinds. The parade was canceled last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9901300Participants in the 2021 Cowboy Gathering parade make their way up Main Avenue on Saturday morning with four-legged animals of all kinds. The parade was canceled last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald8591300Participants in the 2021 Cowboy Gathering parade make their way up Main Avenue on Saturday morning with four-legged animals of all kinds. The parade was canceled last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald8671300Participants in the 2021 Cowboy Gathering parade make their way up Main Avenue on Saturday morning with four-legged animals of all kinds. The parade was canceled last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald8371300Participants in the 2021 Cowboy Gathering parade make their way up Main Avenue on Saturday morning with four-legged animals of all kinds. The parade was canceled last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald762950Participants in the 2021 Cowboy Gathering parade make their way up Main Avenue on Saturday morning with four-legged animals of all kinds. The parade was canceled last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9081300Participants in the 2021 Cowboy Gathering parade make their way up Main Avenue on Saturday morning with four-legged animals of all kinds. The parade was canceled last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald8371300Participants in the 2021 Cowboy Gathering parade make their way up Main Avenue on Saturday morning with four-legged animals of all kinds. The parade was canceled last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald762950Participants in the 2021 Cowboy Gathering parade make their way up Main Avenue on Saturday morning with four-legged animals of all kinds. The parade was canceled last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9151300Participants in the 2021 Cowboy Gathering parade make their way up Main Avenue on Saturday morning with four-legged animals of all kinds. The parade was canceled last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald6641300
Riders compete in the Ska/Zia Town Series finale on WednesdayMen and women take off in the A category short-track cross-country race at the finale of the Ska/Zia Town series on Wednesday on the Factory Trails STXC course in Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald8921600Madelyn Roberson takes off at the start of the men's and women's A category finale of the Ska/Zia Town Series race on Wednesday on the Factory Trails STXC course in Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10671600Natalie Quinn competes in the A-race in the Ska/Zia Town Series on Wednesday at the Factory Trails STXC course in Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald7831300Orrin Bleth competes in the A category of the Ska/Zia Town Series race on Wednesday on the Factory Trails STXC course in Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9031300Stephan Davoust competes in the A category at the Ska/Zia Town Series race on Wednesday on the Factory Trails STXC course in Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1284950Jesus Vargas competes Friday in the Ska/Zia Town Series. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9481300Riders make the first curve during the start of the men's and women's A-race in the Ska/Zia Town Series finale Wednesday at the Factory Trails STXC course in Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10751600Nicholas Elliott, left, and George Piepgras compete in the A-category of the Ska/Zia Town Series race on Wednesday at the Factory Trails STXC course in Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10601600Ruth Holcomb wins the women's A-category at the Ska/Zia Town Series race Wednesday on the Factory Trails STXC course in Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald710950Ruth Holcomb pedals away from the competition on Wednesday. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11731600Riders compete in the men's and women's A category race of the Ska/Zia Town Series finale on Wednesday on the Factory Trails STXC course in Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald20204612Riders compete in the men's and women's A category race of the Ska/Zia Town Series finale on Wednesday on the Factory Trails STXC course in Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald8711300Riders compete in the men's and women's A category race of the Ska/Zia Town Series finale on Wednesday on the Factory Trails STXC course in Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald8671300Kye Cordes competes in the A-race at the Ska/Zia Town Series finale on Wednesday on the Factory Trails STXC course in Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald8581300Michaela Thompson places second in the women's category in the A-race on Wednesday. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald8671300Keiran Eagen competes in the men's A-race at the Ska/Zia Town Series finale on Wednesday on the Factory Trails STXC course in Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9261300Riley Amos competes in the A-category race at the Ska/Zia Town Series finale on Wednesday at the Factory Trails STXC course in Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10961600
Should methane rules extend to older wells?U.S. Sens. Bennet, Hickenlooper seek to extend Obama-era protections to orphaned and abandoned sites15551629The orange and red spots on this satellite image produced between 2003 and 2009 show the area in the country with the highest concentrations of methane. The San Juan basin contains the “reddest” spot in the U.S., making it the most concentrated source of methane emissions in the country, said Gwen Lachelt. (Courtesy of NASA, JPL Caltech, University of Michigan)The San Juan Basin in Southwest Colorado and northwest New Mexico is home to more than 30,000 gas wells, some active, others inactive. As a major producer of natural gas in the early 2000s, it has also been identified as a major producer of methane gas emissions.In fact, satellite images taken between 2003 and 2009 showed a 2,500-square-mile methane hot spot over the basin. A study later found 250 different sites that accounted for over 50% of the emissions, all related to energy extraction methods. Scientists from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory used thermal camera imaging in 2016 show how natural gas spews from industry facilities in the basin. And more recently, the Environmental Protection Agency and New Mexico Environment Department reported 61 leaks of methane and volatile organic compounds from a variety of oil and gas equipment, including storage tanks and flares, in the San Juan Basin.But as production wanes, what should happen to those old or abandoned wells still leaking methane?Sens. Michael Bennet and John Hickenlooper are leading the call for stronger protective methane standards for the oil and gas industry.For years, research has shown the Four Corners sits under a methane hot spot. Now, Sens. Michael Bennet and John Hickenlooper are leading the call for stronger protective methane standards for the oil and gas industry. In a letter to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Sept. 23, Bennet, Hickenlooper and other Colorado representatives urged the extension of Obama-era protections to older wells. According to data released by the EPA in 2018, more than 3.2 million abandoned oil and gas wells emitted 281 kilotons of methane, equivalent to consuming about 16 million barrels of crude oil.“Methane is the main component of natural gas and a climate pollutant many times more potent than carbon dioxide, especially in the near-term,” Bennet and other lawmakers wrote in a statement. “Deploying all technically feasible measures now could cut methane pollution in half by 2030, slowing climate change and avoiding up to a quarter degree of warming by midcentury. To have a chance of limiting warming to 1.5 degrees, we must seize every opportunity to reduce these emissions in the near term.”In 2016, a two-year study released by NASA confirmed that energy extraction practices were responsible for the methane hot spot found over the Four Corners. A previous argument made the case that the emissions were from natural steeps, but it was found that most of them were related to industrial facilities.This discovery led to demands for legislation and regulations to reduce emissions. In 2016, the Obama administration adopted regulations similar to those originally passed by Colorado. Colorado was the first state to pass state-level regulations on methane emissions and pollution in the oil and gas sectors. The Trump administration rolled them back but they were restored in May 2021 by a bipartisan vote in Congress.While the lawmakers are satisfied with the restoration of the regulations, they wrote that the issue of older wells has been ignored. According to the letter, marginal or low-production wells leak at a similar rate as active wells, even though they are exempt from the regulations.24001600Andrew Thorpe, with NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, powers up a thermal camera imaging system in 2016 next to a storage tank at a natural-gas facility near Aztec. Researchers were in the Four Corners working on a collaborative study to reveal the cause of the methane concentration over the area. (Shaun Stanley/PBS NewsHour file)A 2021 study conducted by McGill University found that the annual methane emissions from abandoned oil and gas wells have been underestimated. U.S. estimates are about 20% below actual levels, according to the study.“These wells represent a majority of the nation’s fleet, just a small percentage of oil and gas production, and about half of the methane emissions from the industry,” Bennet and others wrote in the letter. “We urge EPA to eliminate the low-production well exemption and ensure these wells are subject to rigorous leak-detection and repair requirements.”In 2020, according to state data, there were 17,196 inactive wells, producing less than one barrel of oil each day.Some of the other measures the letter outlines include frequent traditional and advanced monitoring; subjecting all wells to leak-detection and repair requirements; eliminating the practice of routine flaring; and preventing abandoned wells.Gwen Lachelt, a former La Plata County commissioner, is executive director of the Western Leaders Network, a nonprofit comprising over 450 officials who support conservation policies.Having seen the public health effects it has had on people in Durango and the surrounding area, specifically with the region consistently receiving a low grade by the American Lung Association because of ozone, Lachelt is happy legislators are focusing on more ways to reduce methane emissions than just focusing on oil and gas facilities.“Orphaned and abandoned wells are a huge problem,” she said. “We’ve got to include cleanup of those wells with this big focus, and there are a few bills out there, like Sen. Bennet’s bill and Sen. Lujan’s bill. They would all address the old and abandoned wells. You can’t say that we are going to reduce methane emissions from oil and gas facilities and then leave out what could be tens of thousands, if not more, abandoned wells.”24001507This photograph of a laptop computer screen in 2016 shows a storage tank spewing methane gas next to a natural-gas facility near Aztec, as seen from a thermal camera imaging system operated by Andrew Thorpe of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. (Shaun Stanley/PBS NewsHour file photo)Dan Haley, president of the Colorado Oil and Gas Association, said Colorado’s specific statewide regulations were effective. But he doesn’t believe nationwide regulations and mandates are beneficial.“Hard and heavy top-down mandates only serve to divide and frustrate people, and may not produce beneficial outcomes,” Haley told The Durango Herald. “Every state and every basin faces different challenges where one size doesn’t fit all.”728601The San Juan BasinThe San Juan Basin is an example of a basin that is affected by the activities of different states, and it is home to the highest concentration of methane pollution in the U.S.Bordering New Mexico and Colorado, each state has different laws and regulations regarding methane emissions. While Colorado is ahead of other states in regulations, New Mexico recently proposed tougher regulations on the oil and gas sectors.New Mexico is ranked second in the U.S. for oil and gas production.Christi Zeller, executive director of the La Plata County Energy Council, said varying state laws and regulations, like stricter methane rules in Colorado but laxer guidelines in New Mexico, do not have much of an impact on methane emissions in the San Juan Basin.“The methane cloud over Durango has not been a matter of fact, any of the leakage. That’s the headline, but that’s not the truth,” Zeller said. “You cannot paint the U.S. emission regulations with one stroke nationwide when you can’t recognize different basins’ products.”Zeller said La Plata County is capturing methane in the basin because it is the only product. She said the nationwide laws wouldn’t affect the emissions levels because they already follow Colorado’s stricter laws. However, most of the emissions come from New Mexico.0VideoYouTube480360According to a study conducted by the EPA and New Mexico’s Environmental Department, the San Juan Basin’s leak rate was 3% in 2020. The Environmental Department said the leaks in the Permian and San Juan basins were “higher-than-expected leak rates” at the time the study was released.“The emissions, which mostly result from equipment failures and unaddressed leaks, documented during the flyovers in the Permian and San Juan Basins are significantly higher than those reported by industry and are in line with those identified by non-governmental organizations and academia,” according to the news release issued in December 2020.The Southern Ute Indian Tribe also voluntarily captures and processes methane emissions from underground coal beds, eliminating 23,000 to 60,000 tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions each year, according to the Colorado Carbon Fund.Emelie Frojen has seen the impact emissions have had across the Four Corners. At San Juan Citizens Alliance, she advocates for nationwide environmental standards.“Air pollution doesn’t stay within state lines, and what goes on between neighboring states also affects Colorado,” she said. “So we are actively engaged in state level and some federal level rule-making processes.”Currently, there are more than 30,000 wells in the basin but some are inactive. The Bureau of Land Management and New Mexico laws require companies to secure bonds to comply with regulations, including plugging wells. Colorado launched a massive cleanup of abandoned wells throughout La Plata County in 2020.Bennet introduced legislation in June to clean up orphaned wells while strengthening bonding requirements.“Methane regulations mean a lot for our community in helping us fight climate change, with droughts and fires, just to name a few, and the Four Corners is particularly vulnerable to climate change and we have to be a leader on methane issues for the resilience of our community,” Frojen said.Kelsey Carolan is an intern for The Durango Herald and The Journal in Cortez and a senior graduating in December 2021 at American University in Washington, D.C.
U.S. Sens. Bennet, Hickenlooper seek to extend Obama-era protections to orphaned and abandoned sites
Durango ladder truck reaches new heightsScott Gallagher, fire training captain with Durango Fire Protection District, controls the ladder from the bucket on the department’s newest ladder truck, Tower 1, as he approaches the Fire Training Facility about 60 feet in the air during a demonstration of the truck Wednesday at Station 1 in Bodo Industrial Park. The ladder has a maximum height of 100 feet. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9971600Tower 1, Durango Fire Protection District's newest ladder truck that can reach 100 feet is pulled out of Station 1 on Wednesday in Bodo Industrial Park. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11521600Durango Fire Protection District's newest ladder truck can reach 100 feet high. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1396950Durango Fire Protection District's newest ladder truck can reach 100 feet high. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10431600Scott Gallagher, fire training captain with Durango Fire Protection District, controls the ladder from a bucket on the ladder truck. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10671600A view from the top of Durango Fire Protection District's newest ladder truck, Tower 1, during a demonstration Wednesday at Station 1 in Bodo Industrial Park. The ladder has a maximum hight of 100 feet. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10461600A new ladder truck purchased by Durango Fire Protection District reaches 100 feet high. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1425950A new ladder truck purchased by Durango Fire Protection District reaches 100 feet high. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10641600Scott Gallagher, fire training captain with Durango Fire Protection District, controls the ladder from the bucket on the departments newest ladder truck. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1362950A view from the top of Durango Fire Protection District's newest ladder truck, Tower 1, during a demonstration Wednesday at Station 1 in Bodo Industrial Park. The ladder has a maximum hight of 100 feet. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10781600Scott Gallagher, fire training captain with Durango Fire Protection District, controls the ladder from the bucket on the departments newest ladder truck. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1450940Scott Gallagher, fire training captain with Durango Fire Protection District, controls the ladder from the bucket on the departments newest ladder truck. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1358950