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Photos: Red Road to D.C. Totem Pole Journey stops at Fort Lewis College

Great Old Broads for Wilderness hosted the Red Road to D.C. Totem Pole Journey on Tuesday at Fort Lewis College, with about 100 people in attendance. The Lummi Nation in Washington state carved the 24-foot totem pole, and is taking it on a cross-country tour to Washington, D.C. The journey will highlight 20 Indigenous-led struggles to protect sacred lands, waters and wildlife. The totem pole, created by the Lummi Nation’s House of Tears Carvers, will carry the spirit of the lands and the power, prayers and demands of the communities it visits. The totem pole will be gifted to the White House and U.S. Congress. (Jerry McBride/Durango Herald)
Great Old Broads for Wilderness hosted the Red Road to D.C. Totem Pole Journey on Tuesday at Fort Lewis College, with about 100 people in attendance. The Lummi Nation in Washington state carved the 24-foot totem pole, and is taking it on a cross-country tour to Washington, D.C. The journey will highlight 20 Indigenous-led struggles to protect sacred lands, waters and wildlife. The totem pole, created by the Lummi Nation’s House of Tears Carvers, will carry the spirit of the lands and the power, prayers and demands of the communities it visits. The totem pole will be gifted to the White House and U.S. Congress. (Jerry McBride/Durango Herald)
Great Old Broads for Wilderness hosted the Red Road to D.C. Totem Pole Journey on Tuesday at Fort Lewis College, with about 100 people in attendance. The Lummi Nation in Washington state carved the 24-foot totem pole, and is taking it on a cross-country tour to Washington, D.C. The journey will highlight 20 Indigenous-led struggles to protect sacred lands, waters and wildlife. The totem pole, created by the Lummi Nation’s House of Tears Carvers, will carry the spirit of the lands and the power, prayers and demands of the communities it visits. The totem pole will be gifted to the White House and U.S. Congress. (Jerry McBride/Durango Herald)
Great Old Broads for Wilderness hosted the Red Road to D.C. Totem Pole Journey on Tuesday at Fort Lewis College, with about 100 people in attendance. The Lummi Nation in Washington state carved the 24-foot totem pole, and is taking it on a cross-country tour to Washington, D.C. The journey will highlight 20 Indigenous-led struggles to protect sacred lands, waters and wildlife. The totem pole, created by the Lummi Nation’s House of Tears Carvers, will carry the spirit of the lands and the power, prayers and demands of the communities it visits. The totem pole will be gifted to the White House and U.S. Congress. (Jerry McBride/Durango Herald)