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Vaccinations increase, but a partisan divide persists, poll shows

Army veteran Phil Ross, 73, receives a COVID-19 vaccine from registered nurse Ola Arije at Veterans Community Living Center at Fitzsimons in Aurora on Dec. 22, 2020. Ross was the first senior-care center resident in Colorado to receive the vaccine. (Pool photo by Hyoung Chang/The Denver Post)
About Polis’ handling of the pandemic: 60% said they approve, 32% said they disapprove and 8% said they have no opinion

An increasing share of Colorado adults are getting the COVID-19 vaccine, though a dramatic partisan divide remains in who is getting inoculated, a new poll shows.

A survey of 545 Colorado adults conducted by conservative-leaning Magellan Strategies from June 3 to June 10 provides more evidence that the state is on track to inoculate more than 70% of its residents with at least one dose of coronavirus vaccine by July 4. Gov. Jared Polis said June 18 that he believes the goal, set by President Joe Biden, will be reached in Colorado.

The poll from the Louisville-based firm showed that 90% of Colorado adults who are registered as Democrats have received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine, while 7% have yet to get inoculated and 3% refused to say. Among Colorado adults who are registered as unaffiliated voters, 76% have received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine, while 15% have yet to get inoculated.

But only 57% of Republicans said they have received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine, with 26% saying they haven’t been inoculated and 17% refusing to answer.

The poll had a margin of error of 4.2 percentage points.

The survey echoes months of coronavirus vaccine polling in Colorado, showing that Republicans are less interested in getting vaccinated against COVID-19.

A recent Colorado Sun analysis of county’s vaccination rates and 2020 presidential election results showed that counties that heavily backed now-President Biden, a Democrat, have the highest vaccination rates in the state. Counties that voted heavily for former President Donald Trump, a Republican, have some of the lowest.

People who got vaccinated told Magellan they did so for the following reasons:

  • “I did not want to get myself or family sick.”
  • “It’s a requirement for students at CU Boulder.”
  • “I want the pandemic to end.”
  • “To protect myself and others.”

Those who have not been inoculated said they haven’t gotten the shot or shots because:

  • “Afraid of side effects.”
  • “I don’t trust big pharmaceutical companies.”
  • “I see it (COVID-19) as the flu.”
  • “Time-management issues.”

Of the 406 Colorado adults who were polled, 7% said they regret getting vaccinated. Magellan Strategies said the majority of those people mentioned prolonged side effects or fears of future side effects.

Forty-two percent of those vaccinated said they have not changed their prevention behaviors since getting vaccinated, while 53% said they have begun to ease up on efforts to keep themselves from catching COVID-19.

Fifty-six percent of people polled said they approve of how the Biden administration is handling the coronavirus pandemic, while 36% said they disapprove and 8% said they had no opinion.

When it comes to Polis’ handling of the pandemic, 60% said they approve, 32% said they disapprove and 8% said they have no opinion.

Read more at The Colorado Sun

The Colorado Sun is a reader-supported, nonpartisan news organization dedicated to covering Colorado issues. To learn more, go to coloradosun.com.